Science and Mathematics – Course Descriptions



Science and Mathematics Division

A – BC – D- E – F – G – H – I J – K – L – M – N – O – P – Q – R S – T – U – V – W – X – Y – Z


Biology – BIOL 1322 – Nutrition & Diet Therapy. Three Hours Credit. This course introduces general nutritional concepts in health and disease and includes practical applications of that knowledge. Special emphasis is given to nutrients and nutritional processes including functions, food sources, digestion, absorption, and metabolism. Food safety, availability, and nutritional information including food labels, advertising, and nationally established guidelines are addressed (Cross-listed as HECO 1322). Three lecture hours each week.
Biology – BIOL 1406 – Biology for Science Majors I (Lecture + Lab). Four Hours Credit. Fundamental principles of living organisms will be studied, including physical and chemical properties of life, organization, function, evolutionary adaptation, and classification. Concepts of cytology, reproduction, genetics, and scientific reasoning are included. The laboratory portion of the course will reinforce the fundamental principles of living organisms, including physical and chemical properties of life, organization, function, evolutionary adaptation, and classification. Study and examination of the concepts of cytology, reproduction, genetics, and scientific reasoning are included. This course is designed for science or related majors. Three lecture and two lab hours each week. Lab fee.

 

Biology – BIOL 1407 – Biology for Science Majors II (Lecture + Lab)
Four Hours Credit. The diversity and classification of life will be studied, including animals, plants, protists, fungi, and prokaryotes. Special emphasis will be given to anatomy, physiology, ecology, and evolution of plants and animals. The laboratory portion of the course will reinforce study of the diversity and classification of life, including animals, plants, protists, fungi, and prokaryotes. Special emphasis will be given to anatomy, physiology, ecology, and evolution of plants and animals. Recommended prerequisite: BIOL 1406. Three lecture and two lab hours each week. Lab fee.

 

Biology – BIOL 1408 – Biology for Non-science Majors I (Lecture + Lab). Four hours credit. Provides a survey of biological principles with an emphasis on humans, including chemistry of life, cells, structure, function, and reproduction. The laboratory portion of this course will reinforce a survey of biological principles with an emphasis on humans, including chemistry of life, cells, structure, function, and reproduction. This course is not intended for science majors. Three lecture and two lab hours each week. Lab fee.

 

Biology – BIOL 1409 – Biology for Non-science Majors II (Lecture + Lab). Four hours credit. This course will provide a survey of biological principles with an emphasis on humans, including evolution, ecology, plant and animal diversity, and physiology. The laboratory portion of this course will reinforce a survey of biological principles with an emphasis on humans, including evolution, ecology, plant and animal diversity, and physiology. This course is not intended for science majors. Three lecture and two lab hours each week. Lab fee.

 

Biology – BIOL 1411 – General Botany (Lecture + Lab). Four hours credit. Fundamental biological concepts relevant to plant physiology, life cycle, growth and development, structure and function, and cellular and molecular metabolism. The role of plants in the environment, evolution, and phylogeny of major plant groups, algae, and fungi is also included. The laboratory portion of this course will reinforce fundamental biological concepts relevant to plant physiology, life cycle, growth and development, structure and function, and cellular and molecular metabolism. The role of plants in the environment, evolution, and phylogeny of major plant groups, algae, and fungi is also included. This course is intended for science majors. Three lecture and two lab hours each week. Lab fee.

 

Biology – BIOL 1413 General Zoology (Lecture + Lab). Four hours credit. Fundamental biological concepts relevant to animals, including systematics, evolution, structure and function, cellular and molecular metabolism, reproduction, development, diversity, phylogeny, and ecology. The laboratory portion of this course will reinforce fundamental biological concepts relevant to animals, including systematics, evolution, structure and function, cellular and molecular metabolism, reproduction, development, diversity, phylogeny, and ecology. (This course is intended for science majors.) Three lecture and two lab hours each week. Lab fee.

 

Biology – BIOL 2106 – Environmental Biology Laboratory. One hour credit. Laboratory activities will reinforce principles of environmental systems and ecology, including biogeochemical cycles, energy transformations, abiotic interactions, symbiotic relationships, natural resources and their management, lifestyle analysis, evolutionary trends, hazards and risks, and approaches to ecological research. Two lab hours each week. Co-requisite: BIOL 2306. Lab fee.

 

Biology – BIOL 2306 – Environmental Biology (Lecture + Lab). Three hours credit. Principles of environmental systems and ecology, including biogeochemical cycles, energy transformations, abiotic interactions, symbiotic relationships, natural resources and their management, lifestyle analysis, evolutionary trends, hazards and risks, and approaches to ecological research. Co-requisite: BIOL 2106. Three lecture hours each week.

 

Biology – BIOL 2401 – Anatomy and Physiology I (Lecture + Lab). Four hours credit. Anatomy and Physiology I is the first part of a two course sequence. It is a study of the structure and function of the human body including cells, tissues and organs of the following systems: integumentary, skeletal, muscular, nervous and special senses. Emphasis is on interrelationships among systems and regulation of physiological functions involved in maintaining homeostasis. The lab provides a hands-on learning experience for exploration of human system components and basic physiology. Prerequisite: TSIA Complete. Three lecture and three lab hours each week. Lab fee.

 

Biology – BIOL 2402 Anatomy and Physiology II (Lecture + Lab). Four hours credit. Anatomy and Physiology II is the second part of a two-course sequence. It is a study of the structure and function of the human body including the following systems: endocrine, cardiovascular, immune, lymphatic, respiratory, digestive (including nutrition), urinary (including fluid and electrolyte balance), and reproductive (including human development and genetics). Emphasis is on interrelationships among systems and regulation of physiological functions involved in maintaining homeostasis. The lab provides a hands-on learning experience for exploration of human system components and basic physiology. Three lecture and three lab hours each week. Prerequisite: TSIA Complete; Grade of C or better in BIOL 2401. Lab fee.

 

Biology – BIOL 2404 – General Anatomy and Physiology (Lecture + Lab). Four hours credit. Study of the structure and function of human anatomy, including the neuroendocrine, integumentary, musculoskeletal, digestive, urinary, reproductive, respiratory, and circulatory systems. Prerequisite: TSIA complete. Three lecture and three lab hours each week. Lab fee.

 

Biology – BIOL 2420 Microbiology for Non-science Majors (Lecture + Lab). Four hours credit. This course covers basic microbiology and immunology and is primarily directed at pre-nursing, pre-allied health, and non-science majors and covers the basics of microbiology. It provides an introduction to historical concepts of the nature of microorganisms, microbial diversity, the importance of microorganisms and acellular agents in the biosphere, and their roles in human and animal diseases. Major topics include bacterial structure as well as growth, physiology, genetics, and biochemistry of microorganisms. Emphasis is on medical microbiology, infectious diseases, and public health. The laboratory portion of this course covers basics of culture and identification of bacteria and microbial ecology. Prerequisite: TSIA Complete. Lab fee. Three lecture and three lab hours each week.

 

Biology – BIOL 2421 – Microbiology for Science Majors (Lecture + Lab). Four hours credit. Principles of microbiology, including metabolism, structure, function, genetics, and phylogeny of microbes. The course will also examine the interactions of microbes with each other, hosts, and the environment. The laboratory portion of the course will reinforce principles of microbiology, including metabolism, structure, function, genetics, and phylogeny of microbes. The course will also examine the interactions of microbes with each other, hosts, and the environment. Required for science majors and pre-professional students, optional for preveterinary students. Prerequisites: CHEM 1411, BIOL 1406, and BIOL 1407 OR BIOL 1411 and BIOL 1413. Three lecture and three lab hours each week. Lab fee.
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Chemistry – CHEM 1305 – Introductory Chemistry I (Lecture + Lab). Three hours credit. Survey course introducing chemistry. Topics may include inorganic, organic, biochemistry, food/physiological chemistry, and environmental/consumer chemistry. Designed for non-science students. Two lab hours each week. Lab fee.

 

Chemistry – CHEM 1105 – Introductory Chemistry Lab I. One hour credit. Laboratory experiences to supplement CHEM 1305. Three lab hours each week. Prerequisite or co-requisite: CHEM 1305. Lab fee.

 

Chemistry – CHEM 1107 – Introductory Chemistry Lab II. One hour credit. Laboratory experiences to supplement CHEM 1307. Three lab hours each week. Prerequisite or corequisite: CHEM 1307. Lab fee.

 

Chemistry – CHEM 1307 – Introductory Chemistry II (Lecture + Lab). Three hours credit. Survey course introducing chemistry. Topics may include inorganic, organic, biochemistry, food/physiological chemistry, and environmental/consumer chemistry. Designed for non-science students. Three lecture hours each week. Lab fee.

 

Chemistry – CHEM 1411 – General Chemistry I (Lecture + Lab). Four hours credit. Fundamental principles of chemistry for majors in the sciences, health sciences, and engineering; topics include measurements, fundamental properties of matter, states of matter, chemical reactions, chemical stoichiometry, periodicity of elemental properties, atomic structure, chemical bonding, molecular structure, solutions, properties of gases, and an introduction to thermodynamics and descriptive chemistry. Basic laboratory experiments supporting theoretical principles presented in the lecture component; introduction of the scientific method, experimental design, data collection and analysis, and preparation of laboratory reports.  Prerequisite: MATH 1314 or equivalent academic preparation (corequisite enrollment with approval). Three lecture and three lab hours each week. Lab fee.

 

Chemistry – CHEM 1412 – General Chemistry II (Lecture + Lab). Four hours credit. Chemical equilibrium; phase diagrams and spectrometry; acid base concepts; thermodynamics; kinetics; electrochemistry; nuclear chemistry; an introduction to organic chemistry and descriptive inorganic chemistry. Basic laboratory experiments supporting theoretical principles presented in the lecture component; introduction of the scientific method, experimental design, chemical instrumentation, data collection and analysis, and preparation of laboratory reports.  Prerequisite: CHEM 1411. Three lecture and three lab hours each week. Lab fee.

 

Computer Science – COSC 1301 – Introduction to Computing. Three hours credit. Overview of computer systems-hardware, operating systems, and microcomputer application software, including the Internet, word processing, spreadsheets, presentation graphics, and databases. Current issues such as the effect of computers on society, and the history and use of computers in business, educational, and other modern settings are also studied. This course is not intended to count toward a student’s major field of study in business or computer science. (This course is no longer cross-listed as BCIS 1301 and 1401). Three lecture hours each week. Lab fee.

 

Computer Science – COSC 1315 – Fundamentals of Programming. Three hours credit. Introduction to computer programming. Emphasis on the fundamentals of structured design, development, testing, implementation, and documentation. Includes coverage of language syntax, data and file structures, input/output devices, and disks/files. Prerequisite: TSIA Complete. Lab fee.

 

Computer Science – COSC 1336 – Programming Fundamentals I. Three hours credit. Introduces the fundamental concepts of structured programming and provides a comprehensive introduction to programming for computer science and technology majors. Topics include software development methodology, data types, control structures, functions, arrays, and the mechanics of running, testing, and debugging. This course assumes computer literacy. This course is included in the Field of Study Curriculum for Computer Science. Three lecture and one lab hour each week. Prerequisite: TSIA Complete. Lab fee.

 

Computer Science – COSC 1337 – Programming Fundamentals II. Three hours credit.  This course focuses on the object-oriented programming paradigm, emphasizing the definition and use of classes along with fundamentals of object-oriented design. The course includes basic analysis of algorithms, searching and sorting techniques, and an introduction to software engineering processes. Students will apply techniques for testing and debugging software. (This course is included in the Field of Study Curriculum for Computer Science.) Prerequisite: COSC 1336.

 

Computer Science – COSC 2325 – Computer Organization. Three hours credit. The organization of computer systems is introduced using assembly language. Topics include basic concepts of computer architecture and organization, memory hierarchy, data types, computer arithmetic, control structures, interrupt handling, instruction sets, performance metrics, and the mechanics of testing and debugging computer systems. Embedded systems and device interfacing are introduced. Prerequisite: COSC 1336.

 

Computer Science – COSC 2336 – Programming Fundamentals III. Three hours credit. Further applications of programming techniques, introducing the fundamental concepts of data structures and algorithms. Topics include data structures (including stacks, queues, linked lists, hash tables, trees, and graphs), searching, sorting, recursion, and algorithmic analysis. Programs will be implemented in an appropriate object oriented language. (This course is included in the Field of Study Curriculum for Computer Science.) Prerequisite: COSC 1337.
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Engineering – ENGR 1201 – Introduction to Engineering. Two hours credit. An introduction to the engineering profession with emphasis on technical communication and team-based engineering design. Co-requisite: ENGR 2104. Prerequisite: MATH 1314 or 1414 (College Algebra) or equivalent academic preparation (acceptable) or MATH 2412 Precalculus (preferred).

 

Engineering – ENGR 1304 – Engineering Graphics I. Three hours credit.  Introduction to computer-aided drafting using CAD software and sketching to generate two- and three-dimensional drawings based on the conventions of engineering graphical communication; topics include spatial relationships, multi-view projections and sectioning, dimensioning, graphical presentation of data, and fundamentals of computer graphics. Two lecture and four lab hours each week. Prerequisite: MATH 1314 College Algebra (acceptable) or MATH 1414 College Algebra (preferred). Lab fee.

 

Engineering – ENGR 2301 – Engineering Mechanics: Statics. Three hours credit. Basic theory of engineering mechanics, using calculus, involving the description of forces, moments, and couples acting on stationary engineering structures; equilibrium in two and three dimensions; free-body diagrams; friction; centroids; centers of gravity; and moments of inertia. Prerequisite: PHYS 2425 University Physics I (Lecture & lab) Co-requisite or Prerequisite: MATH 2414 Calculus II

 

Engineering – ENGR 2302 – Engineering Mechanics: Dynamics. Three hours credit. Basic theory of engineering mechanics, using calculus, involving the motion of particles, rigid bodies, and systems of particles; Newton’s Laws; work and energy relationships; principles of impulse and momentum; application of kinetics and kinematics to the solution of engineering problems. Prerequisite: ENGR 2301 Engineering Mechanics – Statics
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Geology – GEOL 1301 – Earth Sciences for Non-Science Majors I (Lecture). Three hours credit. Survey of geology, meteorology, oceanography, and astronomy. Three lecture hours each week.

 

Geology – GEOL 1403 – Physical Geology (Lecture + Lab). Four hours credit. Introduction to the study of the materials and processes that have modified and shaped the surface and interior of Earth over time. These processes are described by theories based on experimental data and geologic data gathered from field observations. Three lecture and two lab hours each week. Lab fee.

 

Geology – GEOL 1404 – Historical Geology (Lecture + Lab). Four hours credit. A comprehensive survey of the history of life and major events in the physical development of Earth as interpreted from rocks and fossils. Three lecture and two lab hours each week. Prerequisites: GEOL 1403 Physical Geology. Lab Fee
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Mathematics – NCBM 0120 – BASE Non-Course Competency-Based  Introductory Algebra. The BASE NCBM supports students in developing skills, strategies, and reasoning needed to succeed in mathematics, including communication and appropriate use of technology. Topics include the study of numeracy and the real number system; algebraic concepts, notation, and reasoning; quantitative relationships; mathematical models; and problem solving. This intervention is designed specifically for students assessed at BASE levels 3-4 and must be part of a student’s co-enrollment (co-requisite) enrollment in MATH 0320.

 

Mathematics – NCBM 0125 – BASE Non-Course Competency-Based Math Foundations. The BASE NCBM supports students in developing skills, strategies, and reasoning needed to succeed in mathematics, including communication and appropriate use of technology. Topics include the study of numeracy and the real number system; algebraic concepts, notation, and reasoning; quantitative relationships; mathematical models; and problem solving. This intervention is designed specifically for students assessed at BASE levels 3-4 and must be part of a student’s co-enrollment (co-requisite) enrollment in MATH 0325.

 

Mathematics – NCBM 0130 – Non-Course Competency-Based Algebra. A study of relations and functions, inequalities, algebraic expressions and equations (absolute value, polynomial, radical, rational), with a special emphasis on linear and quadratic expressions and equations. Requirements: Minimum class time of 6 weeks. The NCBM cannot be used toward credit for an associate degree and is not intended for transfer to a senior college. Eligibility: TSIA Assessment score 348-349 and DE Level 6; Benefit: paired with MATH 1314 with required course grade of C or better, credit earned can be used in an associate degree; attendance required in lecture and lab hours.

 

 

Mathematics – MATH 0310 – Basic Math. Topics in mathematics such as arithmetic operations, basic algebraic concepts and notation, and geometry. This course may not be used for degree credit and is not intended for transfer to a senior college. Three lecture and one lab hour each week. Eligibility: TSIA score 339 or below and ABE levels 1-3. Lab fee.

 

Mathematics – MATH 0320 – Introductory Algebra. Operations on the set of real numbers. Beginning algebraic concepts, skills, and applications. Solving and graphing linear equations, inequalities, and systems of equations. This course may not be used for degree credit and is not intended for transfer to a senior college. Prerequisite: MATH 0310 or equivalent or TSIA score 340-343 and DE level 4 or 5. Three lecture and one lab hour each week. Lab fee.

 

Mathematics – MATH 0325 – Foundations of Mathematics Reasoning. This course surveys a variety of mathematical topics needed to prepare students for college level statistics or quantitative reasoning for algebra-based courses. Topics include: numeracy with an emphasis on estimation and fluency with large numbers; evaluating expressions and formulas; rates, ratios, and proportions; percentages; solving equations; linear models; date interpretations including graphs and tables; verbal, algebraic and graphical representations of functions; exponential models. This course carries institutional credit but may not be used for degree credit and is not intended for transfer to a senior college. Three lecture and one lab hour each week. Prerequisite: MATH 0310 or equivalent or TSIA score 340 or higher and DE Level 4 or higher. Recommended Corequisite: EDUC 1300. Lab fee.

 

Mathematics – MATH 0330 – Intermediate Algebra. A study of relations and functions, inequalities, algebraic expressions and equations (absolute value, polynomial, radical, rational), with a special emphasis on linear and quadratic expressions and equations. This course may not be used for degree credit and is not intended for transfer to a senior college. Three lecture and one lab hour each week. Lab fee. Prerequisite: MATH 0320 or equivalent or TSIA score 344-347 and DE Level 6.

 

Mathematics – MATH 1314 – College Algebra. Three hours credit. In-depth study and applications of polynomial, rational, radical, exponential and logarithmic functions, and systems of equations using matrices. Additional topics such as sequences, series, probability, and conics may be included. Prerequisite: Meet TSIA college readiness standard for Mathematics or equivalent.

 

Mathematics – MATH 1324 – Mathematics for Business & Social Sciences. Three hours credit. The application of common algebraic functions, including polynomial, exponential, logarithmic, and rational, to problems in business, economics, and the social sciences are addressed. The applications include mathematics of finance, including simple and compound interest and annuities; systems of linear equations; matrices; linear programming; and probability, including expected value. Prerequisite: Meet TSIA college-readiness standard for Mathematics or equivalent.

 

Mathematics – MATH 1325 – Calculus for Business & Social Sciences. Three hours credit. This course is the basic study of limits and continuity, differentiation, optimization and graphing, and integration of elementary functions, with emphasis on applications in business, economics, and social sciences. This course is not a substitute for MATH 2413, Calculus I. Prerequisite: MATH 1324 Mathematics for Business & Social Sciences or MATH 1314 College Algebra.

 

Mathematics – MATH 1332 – Contemporary Mathematics (Math for Liberal Arts Majors I). Three hours credit. Intended for non-STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics) majors. Topics include introductory treatments of sets and logic, financial mathematics, probability and statistics with appropriate applications. Number sense, proportional reasoning, estimation, technology, and communication should be embedded throughout the course. Additional topics may be covered. Prerequisite: TSIA complete or equivalent.

 

Mathematics – MATH 1342 – Elementary Statistical Methods. Three hours credit. Collection, analysis, presentation and interpretation of data, and probability. Analysis includes descriptive statistics, correlation and regression, confidence intervals and hypothesis testing. Use of appropriate technology is recommended.

 

Mathematics – MATH 1350 – Mathematics For Teachers I. Three hours credit. This course is intended to build or reinforce a foundation in fundamental mathematics concepts and skills. It includes the conceptual development of the following: sets, functions, numeration systems, number theory, and properties of the various number systems with an emphasis on problem solving and critical thinking. Prerequisite: MATH 1314 or the equivalent.

 

Mathematics – MATH 1351 – Mathematics For Teachers II. Three hours credit. This course is intended to build or reinforce a foundation in fundamental mathematics concepts and skills. It includes the concepts of geometry, measurement, probability, and statistics with an emphasis on problem solving and critical thinking. Prerequisite: MATH 1350 and MATH 1314 or the equivalent.

 

Mathematics – MATH 1414 – College Algebra (for Science and Engineering Majors). Four hours credit. In-depth study and applications of polynomial, rational, radical, exponential and logarithmic functions, and systems of equations using matrices. Additional topics such as sequences, series, probability, and conics will be included. This course is intended to prepare students for MATH 2412 – Precalculus. Four lecture hours each week.

 

Mathematics – MATH 2118 – Linear Algebra. One hour credit. Systems of linear equations, matrices, vectors and vector spaces, determinants, eigenvalues and eigenvectors. One lecture hour each week. Co-requisite: MATH 2320 or permission of Division Director.

 

Mathematics – MATH 2412 – Pre-Calculus Math. Three hours credit. In-depth combined study of algebra, trigonometry, and other topics for calculus readiness. Four lecture hours each week. Prerequisite: MATH 1314 College Algebra (acceptable) or MATH 1414 College Algebra (preferred).

 

MATHEMATICS – MATH 2318 – Linear Algebra.  Three hours credit. Introduces and provides models for application of the concepts of vector algebra. Topics include finite dimensional vector spaces and their geometric significance; representing and solving systems of linear equations using multiple methods, including Gaussian elimination and matrix inversion; matrices; determinants; linear transformations; quadratic forms; eigenvalues and eigenvector; and applications in science and engineering.  Prerequisite:  MATH 2414 (Calculus II).

 

Mathematics – MATH 2320 – Differential Equations. Three hours credit. Ordinary differential equations, including linear equations, systems of equations, equations with variable coefficients, existence and uniqueness of solutions, series solutions, singular points, transform methods, and boundary value problems; application of differential equations to real-world problems. Three lecture hours each week. Prerequisite: MATH 2414 Calculus II.

 

Mathematics – MATH 2412 – Pre-Calculus Math. Four hours credit. In-depth combined study of algebra, trigonometry, and other topics for calculus readiness. Four lecture hours each week. Prerequisite: MATH 1314 College Algebra (acceptable) or MATH 1414 College Algebra (preferred).

 

Mathematics – MATH 2413 – Calculus I. Four hours credit. Limits and continuity; the Fundamental Theorem of Calculus; definition of the derivative of a function and techniques of differentiation; applications of the derivative to maximizing or minimizing a function; the chain rule, mean value theorem, and rate of change problems; curve sketching; definite and indefinite integration of algebraic, trigonometric, and transcendental functions, with an application to calculation of areas. Prerequisite: MATH 2412 Pre-Calculus Math or equivalent preparation.

 

Mathematics – MATH 2414 – Calculus II. Four hours credit. Differentiation and integration of transcendental functions; parametric equations and polar coordinates; techniques of integration; sequences and series; improper integrals. Prerequisite: MATH 2413 Calculus I.

 

Mathematics – MATH 2415 – Calculus III. Four hours credit. Advanced topics in calculus, including vectors and vector-valued functions, partial differentiation, Lagrange multipliers, multiple integrals, and Jacobians; application of the line integral, including Green’s Theorem, the Divergence Theorem, and Stokes’ Theorem. Prerequisite: MATH 2414 Calculus II

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Physics – PHYS 1305 – Elementary Physics (Lecture). Three hours credit. Conceptual level survey of topics in physics intended for liberal arts and other non-science majors. May or may not include a laboratory. Three lecture hours each week.

 

Physics – PHYS 1105 – Elementary Physics Laboratory. One hour credit. Laboratory experiences to supplement PHYS 1305. Two lab hours each week. Corequisite: PHYS 1305. Lab fee.

 

Physics – PHYS 1115 – Physical Science Laboratory. One hour credit. Laboratory experiences to supplement PHYS 1315. Two lab hours each week. Corequisite: PHYS 1315. Lab fee.

 

Physics – PHYS 1315 – Physical Science I (Lecture). Three hours credit. Course designed for non-science majors, that surveys topics from physics, chemistry, geology, astronomy, and meteorology. May or may not include a laboratory. Three lecture hours each week.

 

Physics – PHYS 1401 – College Physics I (Lecture + Lab). Four hours credit. Fundamental principles of physics, using algebra and trigonometry; the principles and applications of classical mechanics and thermodynamics, including harmonic motion, mechanical waves and sound, physical systems, Newton’s Laws of Motion, and gravitation and other fundamental forces; with emphasis on problem solving. Laboratory activities will reinforce fundamental principles presented in lecture. Three lecture and three lab hours each week. Prerequisite: MATH 1314 College Algebra and Math 1316 Plane Trigonometry OR MATH 2312 Pre-Calculus Math (Math 2412 Pre-Calculus may substitute for 2312). Lab fee.

 

Physics – PHYS 1402 – College Physics II (Lecture + Lab). Four hours credit. Fundamental principles of physics, using algebra and trigonometry; the principles and applications of electricity and magnetism, including circuits, electrostatics, electromagnetism, waves, sound, light, optics, and modern physics topics; with emphasis on problem solving. Laboratory activities will reinforce fundamental principles presented in lecture. Three lecture and two lab hours each week. Prerequisite: PHYS 1301 College Physics I (lecture) or PHYS 1401 College Physics I (lecture + lab). Lab fee.

 

Physics – PHYS 2425 – University Physics I (Lecture + Lab). Four hours credit. Fundamental principles of physics, using calculus, for science, computer science, and engineering majors; the principles and applications of classical mechanics, including harmonic motion, physical systems and thermodynamics; and emphasis on problem solving. Basic laboratory experiments support theoretical principles presented in lecture involving the principles and applications of classical mechanics, including harmonic motion and physical systems; experimental design, data collection and analysis, and preparation of laboratory reports. Three lecture and two lab hours each week. Prerequisite: MATH 2413 Calculus I. Lab fee.

 

Physics – PHYS 2426 – University Physics II (Lecture + Lab). Four hours credit. Principles of physics for science, computer science, and engineering majors, using calculus, involving the principles of electricity and magnetism, including circuits, electromagnetism, waves, sound, light, and optics. Laboratory experiments support theoretical principles presented in lecture involving the principles of electricity and magnetism, including circuits, electromagnetism, waves, sound, light, and optics: experimental design, data collection and analysis, and preparation of laboratory reports. Three lecture and three lab hours each week. Prerequisite: PHYS 2425 University Physics I, MATH 2414 Calculus II. Lab fee.
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