Technology and Workforce – Course Descriptions



Technology and Workforce Division

 

A – B – CDE – F – G – H – I J – K – LM – N – O – P – Q – R ST – U – V – W – X – Y – Z

Automotive Technology – AUMT 1407 – Automotive Electrical Systems. Four hours credit. An overview of automotive electrical systems including topics in operational theory, testing, diagnosis, and repair of charging and starting systems, and electrical accessories. Emphasis on electrical principles schematic diagrams, and service manuals. May be taught manufacturer specific. Utilizing appropriate safety measures, the student will define basic electrical principles; interpret wiring schematics and symbols; explain operation of batteries, starting/charging systems, and automotive circuits; use test equipment; and perform basic electrical repairs. Concurrent enrollment in AUMT 1410. Two lecture and six lab hours each week. Lab fee.

 

Automotive Technology – AUMT 1410 – Automotive Brake Systems. Four hours credit. Operation and repair of drum/disc type brake systems. Topics include brake theory, diagnosis, and repair of power, manual, and anti-lock brake systems, and parking brakes. May be taught manufacturer specific. Utilizing appropriate safety measures, the student will explain operation of modern brake systems; and diagnose and repair hydraulic systems, drum/disc brake systems, and anti-lock brake systems. Concurrent enrollment in AUMT 1407. Two lecture and six lab hours each week. Lab fee.

 

Automotive Technology – AUMT 1416 – Suspension and Steering. Four hours credit. Diagnosis and repair of automotive suspension and steering systems including electronically controlled systems. Includes component repair, alignment procedures and tire and wheel service. May be taught manufacturer specific. Utilizing appropriate safety measures, the student will explain operations of suspension and steering systems; diagnose and repair system components including electronically controlled systems; perform wheel alignment procedures; and perform tire service and repair. Prerequisite: AUMT 1407. Two lecture and six lab hours each week. Lab fee.

 

Automotive Technology – AUMT 1419 – Automotive Engine Repair. Four hours credit. Fundamentals of engine operation, diagnosis and repair. Emphasis on identification, inspection, measurements, disassembly, repair, and reassembly of the engine. May be taught manufacturer specific. Utilizing appropriate safety measures, the student will explain engine operating principles, demonstrate engine diagnostic procedures: cylinder head, valve train, block assembly, lubrication, and cooling systems. Two lecture and six lab hours each week. Lab fee.

 

Automotive Technology – AUMT 1445 – Automotive Climate Control Systems. Four hours credit. Diagnosis and repair of manual/electronic climate control systems; includes the refrigeration cycle and EPA guidelines for refrigerant handling. May be taught manufacturer specific. The student will use safety procedures including proper refrigerant handling; explain the refrigeration cycle; and diagnose and repair systems. Prerequisites: AUMT 1407. Two lecture and six lab hours each week. Lab fee.

 

Automotive Technology – AUMT 2417 – Engine Performance Analysis I. Four hours credit. Theory, operation, diagnosis of drivability concerns, and repair ignition and fuel delivery systems. Use of current engine performance diagnostic equipment. May be taught manufacturer specific. Utilizing appropriate safety measures, the student will explain engine dynamics; diagnose and repair ignition system and fuel delivery systems and use current engine performance diagnostic equipment. Prerequisite/co-requisite: AUMT 1407. Two lecture and six lab hours each week. Lab fee.

 

Automotive Technology – AUMT 2425 – Automotive Automatic Transmission and Transaxle. Four hours credit. A study of the operation, hydraulic principles, and electronic controls of modern automatic transmissions and automatic transaxles. Diagnosis, disassembly and assembly procedures with emphasis on the use of special tools and proper repair techniques. May be taught manufacturer specific. Utilizing appropriate safety measures, the student will diagnose, service, adjust, and repair automatic transmissions/transaxles. Prerequisite: AUMT 1407. Two lecture and six lab hours each week Lab fee.

 

Automotive Technology – AUMT 2434 – Automotive Engine Performance Analysis II. Four Credit hours. Diagnosis and repair of emission systems, computerized engine performance systems, and advanced ignition and fuel systems. Includes use of advanced engine performance diagnostic equipment. May be taught manufacturer specific. Utilizing appropriate safety measures, the student will diagnose and repair emission control systems; computerized engine performance systems, and advanced ignition and fuel systems; and use of advanced engine performance diagnostic equipment. Prerequisite: AUMT 2417. Two lecture and six lab hours each week. Lab fee.

 

Automotive Technology – AUMT 2480 – Cooperative Education Automotive Technology. Four hours credit. Career-related activities encountered in the student’s area of specialization offered through an individualized agreement among the college, employer and student. Under the supervision of the college and the employer, the student combines classroom learning with work experience including a lecture component. The work experience consists of approximately 320 hours of on-the-job training. As outlined in the learning plan, apply the theory, concepts, and skills involving specialized materials, tools, equipment, procedures, regulations, laws and interactions within and among political, economic, environmental, social, and legal systems associated with the occupation and the business/industry and will demonstrate legal and ethical behavior, safety practices, interpersonal and teamwork skills and appropriate written and verbal communication skills using the terminology of the occupation and the business/industry. Fulltime hours each week at a local dealership. Prerequisites: Completion of all AUMT lecture and lab courses with a grade of “C” or better. Capstone experience.
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Child & Family Development – CDEC 1359 – Children with Special Needs. Three hours credit. A survey of information regarding children with special needs including possible causes and characteristics of exceptionalities, intervention strategies, available resources, referral processes, the advocacy role, and legislative issues.

 

Child & Family Development – CDEC 1413 – Curriculum Resources for Early Childhood Programs. Three hours credit. A study of the fundamentals of developmentally appropriate curriculum design and implementation in early care and education programs for children birth through age eight. Course includes 30 hours of field experiences. Three lecture hours each week. Three field experience hours must be conducted weekly for ten assigned weeks. Lab fee.

 

Child & Family Development – CDEC 1417 – Child Development Associate Training I. Four hours credit. Based on the requirements for the Child Development Associate credential (CDA). Topics include CDA overview, observation skills, and child growth and development. The four functional areas of study are creative, cognitive, physical, and communication. Course includes 2 hours of lab. Three lecture hours each week. 150 lab hours required for credentialing process. Lab fee.

 

Child & Family Development – CDEC 1419 – Child Guidance. Four hours credit. An exploration of guidance strategies for promoting prosocial behaviors with individual and groups of children. Emphasis on positive guidance principles and techniques, family involvement, and cultural influences. Course includes 30 hours of field experiences. Three lecture hours each week. Three field experience hours must be conducted weekly for ten assigned weeks. Lab fee.

 

Child & Family Development – CDEC 1421 The Infant and Toddler. Four hours credit. A study of appropriate infant and toddler programs (birth to age 3), including an overview of development, quality routines, learning environments, materials and activities, and teaching/guidance techniques. Course includes 30 hours of field experiences. Three lecture hours each week. Three field experience hours must be conducted weekly for ten assigned weeks. Lab fee.

 

Child & Family Development – CDEC 1458 – Creative Arts for Early Childhood. Four hours credit. An exploration of principles, methods, and materials for teaching music, movement, visual arts, and dramatic play through process-oriented experiences to support divergent thinking for children birth through age eight. Course includes 30 hours of field experiences. Three lecture hours each week. Three field experience hours must be conducted weekly for ten assigned weeks. Lab fee.

 

Child & Family Development – CDEC 2422 – Child Development Associate Training II. Four hours credit. A continuation of the study of the requirements for the Child Development Associate credential (CDA). The six functional areas of study include safe, healthy, learning environment, self, social, and guidance. Course includes 2 hours of lab. Three lecture hours each week. 150 lab hours required for credentialing process. Lab fee.

 

Child & Family Development – CDEC 2424 – Child Development Associate Training III. Four hours credit. Continuation of the requirements for the Child Development Associate credential (CDA). The three functional areas of study include family, program management and professionalism. Course includes 2 hours of lab. Three lecture hours each week. 150 lab hours required for credentialing process. Lab fee.

 

Child & Family Development – CDEC 2426 – Administration Of Programs for Children. Four hours credit. Application of management procedures for early care and education programs. Includes planning, operating, supervising, and evaluating programs. Topics cover philosophy, types of programs, policies, fiscal management, regulations, staffing, evaluation, and communication. Course includes 30 hours of field experiences. Three lecture hours each week. Three field experience hours must be conducted weekly for ten assigned weeks. Lab fee.

 

Child & Family Development – TECA 1303 – Families, School, and Community. Three hours credit. A study of the child, family, community, and schools, including parent education and involvement, family and community lifestyles, child abuse, and current family life issues. Course content must be aligned as applicable with State Board for Educator Certification Pedagogy and Professional Responsibilities standards and coincide with the National Association for the Education of Young Children position statement related to developmentally appropriate practices for children from birth through age eight. Requires students to participate in field experiences with children from infancy through age 12 in a variety of settings with varied and diverse populations. Course includes 30 hours of field experiences. Three lecture hours each week. Three field experience hours must be conducted weekly for ten assigned weeks. Lab fee.

 

Child & Family Development – TECA 1311 – Educating Young Children. Three hours credit. An introduction to the education of the young child, including developmentally appropriate practices and programs, theoretical and historical perspectives, ethical and professional responsibilities, and current issues. Course content must be aligned as applicable with State Board for Educator Certification Pedagogy and Professional Responsibilities standards and coincide with the national Assessment of Educational Progress position statement related to developmentally appropriate practices for children from birth through age eight. Requires students to participate in field experiences with children from infancy through age 12 in a variety of settings with varied and diverse populations; and the course includes 30 hours of field experiences. Three lecture hours each week. Three field experience hours must be conducted weekly for ten assigned weeks. Lab fee.

 

Child & Family Development – TECA 1318 – Wellness of the Young Child. Three hours credit. A study of the factors that impact the well-being of the young child including healthy behavior, food, nutrition, fitness, and safety practices. Focuses on local and national standards and legal implications of relevant policies and regulations. Course content must be aligned as applicable with State Board for Educator Certification Pedagogy and Professional Responsibilities standards and coincide with the National Assessment of Educational Progress position statement related to developmentally appropriate practices for children from birth to age eight. Requires students to participate in field experiences with children from infancy through age 12 in a variety of settings with varied and diverse populations. Course includes 30 hours of field experiences. Three lecture hours each week. Three field experience hours must be conducted weekly for ten assigned weeks. Lab fee.

 

Child & Family Development – TECA 1354 – Child Growth and Development. Three hours credit. A study of the physical, emotional, social, language, and cognitive factors impacting growth and development of children through adolescence. Course content must be aligned as applicable with State Board for Educator Certification Pedagogy and Professional Responsibilities standards and coincide with the National Assessment of Educational Progress position statement related to developmentally appropriate practices for children from birth to age eight. Requires students to participate in field experiences with children from infancy through age 12 in a variety of settings with varied and diverse populations. Course includes 30 hours of field experiences. Three lecture hours each week. Three field experience hours must be conducted weekly for ten assigned weeks. Lab fee.

 

Criminal Justice – CRIJ 1301 – Introduction to Criminal Justice. Three hours credit. This course provides a historical and philosophical overview of the American criminal justice system, including the nature, extent, and impact of crime; criminal law; and justice agencies and processes. Three lecture hours each week.

 

Criminal Justice – CRIJ 1306 – Court Systems & Practices. Three hours credit. This course is a study of the court system as it applies to the structures, procedures, practices and sources of law in American courts, using federal and Texas statues and case law. Three lecture hours each week.

 

Criminal Justice – CRIJ 1307 – Crime in America. Three hours credit. American crime problems in historical perspective, social and public policy factors affecting crime, impact and crime trends, social characteristics of specific crimes, and prevention of crime. Three lecture hours each week.

 

Criminal Justice – CRIJ 1310 – Fundamentals of Criminal Law. Three hours credit. This course is the study of criminal law including application of definitions, statutory elements, defenses and penalties using Texas statutes, the Model Penal Code, and case law. The course also analyzes the philosophical and historical development of criminal law and criminal culpability. Three lecture hours each week.

 

Criminal Justice – CRIJ 1313 – Juvenile Justice System. Three hours credit. A study of the juvenile justice process to include specialized juvenile law, role of the juvenile law, role of the juvenile courts, role of police agencies, role of correctional agencies, and theories concerning delinquency. Three lecture hours each week.

 

Criminal Justice – CRIJ 2301 – Community Resources in Corrections. Three hours credit. An introductory study of the role of the community in corrections; community programs for adults and juveniles; administration of community programs; legal issues; future trends in community treatment. Three lecture hours each week.

 

Criminal Justice – CRIJ 2313 – Correctional Systems and Practices. Three hours credit. This course is a survey of institutional and non-institutional corrections. Emphasis will be placed on the organization and operation of correctional systems; treatment and rehabilitation; populations served; Constitutional issues; and current and future issues. Three lecture hours each week.

 

Criminal Justice – CRIJ 2314 – Criminal Investigation. Three hours credit. Investigative theory; collection and preservation of evidence; sources of information; interview and interrogation; uses of forensic sciences; case and trial preparation. Three lecture hours each week.

 

Criminal Justice – CRIJ 2323 – Legal Aspects of Law Enforcement. Three hours credit. Police authority; responsibilities; constitutional constraints; laws of arrest, search, and seizure; police liability. Three lecture hours each week.

 

Criminal Justice – CRIJ 2328 – Police Systems and Practices. Three hours credit. This course examines the establishment, role and function of police in a democratic society. It will focus on types of police agencies and their organizational structure, police-community interaction, police ethics, and use of authority. Three lecture hours each week.

 

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Diesel Technology – DEMR 1405 – Basic Electrical Systems. Four hours credit. An introduction to the basic principles of electrical systems of diesel powered equipment with emphasis on starters, alternators, batteries, and regulators. The students will perform circuit analysis; identify electrical symbols; use special tools; and test circuits. Prerequisite: Work Keys test sections for Applied Math and Reading for Information Level 4. Three lecture and two lab hours each week. Lab fee.

 

Diesel Technology – DEMR 1406 – Diesel Engine I. Four hours credit. An introduction to the basic principles of diesel engines and systems. The student will describe the history of diesel engines and diesel systems and their evolution; demonstrate knowledge of the basic principles of diesel systems and engines and how they function; and utilize precision instruments to diagnose and repair basic systems and engines. Prerequisite: Work Keys test sections for Applied Math Level 4 and Reading for Information Level 4. Two lecture and six lab hours each week. Lab fee.

 

Diesel Technology – DEMR 1413 – Fuel Systems. Four hours credit. In-depth coverage of fuel injector pumps and injection systems with emphasis on operation and fuel flow. The student will identify various components of injector pumps and injectors as well as the components of the complete fuel system. Evaluation of injector pumps and injectors will be accomplished by the student using special tools for inspection and testing. Prerequisite: Work Keys test sections for Applied Math Level 4 and Reading for Information Level 4. Three lecture and two lab hours each week. Lab fee.

 

Diesel Technology – DEMR 1442 – Power Train Applications I. Four credit hours. In-depth coverage of the mechanics and theory of power trains. Emphasis on disassembly, inspection, and repair of power train components. Interpret power flow; assess component failure; and demonstrate ability to make power train component repairs. Prerequisite: DEMR 1413 and Work Keys test sections for Applied Math Level 4 and Reading for Information Level 4. Three lecture and two lab hours each week.

 

Diesel Technology – DEMR 1449 – Diesel Engine II. Four hours credit. An in-depth coverage of disassembly, repair, identification, evaluation, and reassembly of diesel engines. The student will identify engine components and their working relationship to the engine; evaluate engine components by inspection, testing and/or measurement; and demonstrate disassembly and reassembly of the diesel engine. Prerequisite: DEMR 1406 and Work Keys test sections for Applied MathLevel 4 and Reading for InformationLevel 4. Two lecture and six lab hours each week. Lab fee.

 

Diesel Technology – DEMR 2432 – Electronic Controls. Four hours credit. Study of advanced skills in diagnostic and programming techniques of electronic control systems. The student will utilize specialized tools to diagnose or change parameters; read and interpret technical manuals; and identify and test sensors and actuator circuits. Prerequisite: DEMR 1405 and Work Keys test sections for Applied MathLevel 4 and Reading for Information Level 4. Three lecture and two lab hours each week. Lab fee.

 

Drafting and Design Technology – ARCE 1452 – Structural Drafting. Four hours credit. A study of structural systems including concrete foundations and frames, wood framing and trusses, and structural steel framing systems. Includes detailing of concrete, wood, and steel designed to meet industry standards including the American Institute of Steel Construction and the American Concrete Institute, with emphasis on framed and seated connectors, beam and column detailing, including units on concrete detailing conforming to the American Concrete Institute. Two lecture and four lab hours each week. Lab fee. Prerequisite: DFTG 1409.

 

Drafting and Design Technology – ARCE 2452 – Mechanical and Electrical Systems. Four hours credit. The properties of building materials (assemblies), specifications, codes, vendor references and uses of mechanical, plumbing, conveying, and electrical systems as they relate to architecture for residential and commercial construction. Two lecture and four lab hours each week. Lab fee. Prerequisite: DFTG 1417.

 

Drafting and Design Technology – DFTG 1325 – Blueprint Reading and Sketching. Three hours credit. An introduction to reading and interpreting working drawings for fabrication processes and associated trades. Use of sketching techniques to create pictorial and multiple-view drawings. The student will state the meaning of the alphabet of lines, pictorial and multiple-view drawings, dimensions, notes and symbols, sections and auxiliary views, and working drawings to include detail and assembly drawings. The student will read and interpret drawings create freehand sketches, and use pictorial and orthographic drawing techniques. Three lecture hours.

 

Drafting and Design Technology – DFTG 1405 – Technical Drafting. Four hours credit. Introduction to the principles of drafting to include terminology and fundamentals, including size and shape descriptions, projections methods, geometric construction, sections, auxiliary views, and reproduction processes. Two lecture and four lab hours each week. Lab fee.

 

Drafting and Design Technology – DFTG 1409 – Basic Computer-Aided Drafting. Four hours credit. An introduction to basic computer-aided drafting. Emphasis is placed on drawing setup; creating and modifying geometry; storing and retrieving predefined shapes; placing, rotating, and scaling objects, adding text and dimensions, using layers, coordinating systems, and plot/print to scale; as well as using input and output devices. Two lecture and four lab hours each week. Lab fee.

 

Drafting and Design Technology – DFTG 1417 – Architectural Drafting – Residential. Four hours credit. Architectural drafting procedures, practices, and symbols, including preparation of detailed working drawings for residential structures with emphasis on light frame construction methods. The student will demonstrate a general understanding of architectural terms, symbols, use of residential construction materials and processes, and knowledge of reference materials. The student will demonstrate the ability to produce a set of residential construction drawings to include: site plan, floor plan, elevations, wall sections, schedules, details, and foundation plan. Two lecture and four lab hours each week. Prerequisite: DFTG 1409. Lab fee.

 

Drafting and Design Technology – DFTG 1433 – Mechanical Drafting. Four hours credit. An introductory course covering a study of mechanical drawings using dimensioning and tolerances, use of sectioning techniques, orthographic projections, and pictorial drawings. Common fasteners, isometrics and oblique drawings, including bill of materials. The student will apply tolerance techniques to draw detail, isometric, and oblique drawing and draw common fasteners. Two lecture and four lab hours each week. Prerequisite: DFTG 1409.

 

Drafting and Design Technology – DFTG 2366 – Practicum (Field Experience). Three hours credit. Practical, general workplace training supported by an individualized learning plan developed by the employer, college, and student. The plan relates the workplace training and experiences to the student’s general and technical course of study. The guided external experiences may be for pay or no pay. This course may be repeated if topics and outcomes vary As outlined in the learning plan, the student will master the theory, concepts, and skills involving the tools, materials, equipment, procedures, regulations, laws, and interactions within and among political, economic, environmental, and legal systems associated with the workplace; demonstrate ethical behavior, safety practices, interpersonal and teamwork skills, appropriate verbal and written communications in the workplace. Prerequisite: Thirty-four hours of drafting courses. One lecture hour and sixteen hours at the workplace each week.

 

Drafting and Design Technology – DFTG 2402 – Machine Drafting. Four hours credit. Production of detail and assembly drawings of machines, threads, gears, cams, tolerances, limit dimensioning, surface finishes, and precision drawings. Two lecture and four lab hours each week. Prerequisite: DFTG 1409 and DFTG 1433. Lab fee.

 

Drafting and Design Technology – DFTG 2421 – Topographical Drafting. Four hours credit. A course in map drafting. Emphasis is given to plotting of surveyor’s field notes. Includes plotting and drawing elevations, contour lines, plan and profiles, and laying out traverses. Two lecture and four lab hours each week. Prerequisite: DFTG 1409.

 

Drafting and Design Technology – DFTG 2430 – Civil Drafting. Four hours credit. An in-depth study of drafting methods and principles used in civil engineering. The student will interpret field notes; develop documents for road and highway design; analyze and layout drainage and utilities infrastructure; and perform appropriate calculations. Three lecture and three lab hours each week. Prerequisite: DFTG 1409. Lab fee.

 

Drafting and Design Technology – DFTG 2486 – Internship – Drafting. Four hours credit. A work-based learning experience that enables the student to apply specialized occupational theory, skills and concepts. A learning plan is developed by the college and the employer. Mentored and supervised by a workplace employee, the student achieves objectives that are developed and documented by the college and that are directly related to specific occupational outcomes. This may be a paid or non-paid experience. This course may be repeated if topics and learning outcomes vary. As outlined in the learning plan, the student will master the theory, concepts, and skills involving the tools, materials, equipment, procedures, regulations, laws and interactions within and among political, economic, environmental and legal systems associated with the particular occupation and the business/industry; demonstrate ethical behaviors, safety practices, interpersonal and teamwork skills, communicating in the applicable language of the occupation and the business or industry. Prerequisite: Sophomore standing and a 3.0 or better G.P.A., one hour lecture and sixteen hours each week at the workplace.

 

Drafting and Design Technology – GISC 1411 – Introduction to Geographic Information Systems (GIS) and Global Positions Systems (GPS). Four hours credit. Introduction to basic concepts of vector GIS using several industry specific software programs including nomenclature of cartography and geography. The student will explain basic concepts of GIS and GPS including positioning on the earth, mapping the earth in spatial terms, and populating the GIS to access data; create and access data in the GIS using an appropriate software package; and develop and print maps with industry standard legends. Operate industry standard GIS packages on a personal computer; capture positional and attribute information among several coordinate systems; acquire GIS information from databases, existing maps, and the Internet; and annotate output for finished maps, documents and reports. Prerequisite: DFTG 1409. Two lecture and four lab hours each week. Lab fee.
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Electromechanical Technology – ELMT 2381 – Cooperative Education. Three hours credit. Career-related activities encountered in the student’s area of specialization offered through an individualized agreement among the college, employer, and student. Under the supervision of the college and the employer, the student combines classroom learning with work experience. Includes a lecture component.  As outlined in the learning plan, apply the theory, concepts, and skills involving specialized materials, tools, equipment, procedures, regulations, laws, and interactions within and among political, economic, environmental, social, and legal systems associated with the occupation and the business/industry; and will demonstrate legal and ethical behavior, safety practices, interpersonal and teamwork skills, and appropriate written and verbal communication skills using the terminology of the occupation and the business/industry. One lecture and twenty field experience hours each week. Pre-requisite: Work Keys test section for Applied Math Level 4 and Reading for Information Level 4. Students enrolling in this course must have a GPA of 3.00 or higher.

Electromechanical Technology – ELPT 1321 – Introduction to Electrical Safety and Tools. Three hours credit. A comprehensive overview of safety rules and regulations and the selection, inspection, use, and maintenance of common tools for electricians. The student will explain electrical hazards and how to avoid them in the workplace; discuss safety issues concerning lockout/tagout procedures; and demonstrate safe work habits using common hand and power tools for electricians. Three lecture hours and one lab hour each week. Pre-requisite : Work Keys test section for Applied Math Level 4 and Reading for Information Level 4.

 

Electromechanical Technology – ELPT 1411 – Basic Electrical Theory. Four hours credit. Basic theory and practice of electrical circuits. Includes calculations as applied to alternating and direct current. Students will be able to explain atomic structure and basic values such as voltage, current, resistance, and power; determine electrical values for combination circuits in direct current (DC) and alternating current (AC) containing resistance, inductance, and capacitance; summarize the principles of magnetism; calculate voltage drop based on conductor length, type of material, and size; and utilize electrical measuring instruments. Three lecture and two lab hours each week. Lab fee. Pre-requisite : Work Keys test section for Applied Math Level 4 and Reading for Information Level 4.

 

Electromechanical Technology – ELPT 1429 – Residential Wiring. Four hours credit. Wiring methods for single family and multi-family dwellings. Includes load calculations, service entrance sizing, proper grounding techniques, and associated safety procedures. Students will be able to compute the circuit sizes needed for the installation of branch circuits, feeders, and service entrance conductors; explain the proper installation of wiring devices according to electrical codes; demonstrate grounding methods; install ground fault circuits; identify residential wiring methods; and demonstrate proper safety procedures. Three lecture and two lab hours each week. Lab fee. Pre-requisite : Work Keys test section for Applied Math Level 4 and Reading for Information Level 4.

 

Electromechanical Technology – ELPT 1440 – Master Electrician Exam Review I. Four hours credit. Electrical theory, code calculations, and interpretations applicable to becoming a Master Electrician. Emphasizes residential, commercial, and industrial installations using the current edition of the National Electric Code (NEC) and local ordinances. Student will be able to use circuit analysis techniques to solve for unknowns in direct current (DC) and alternating current (AC) circuits; use the NEC to size conductors, raceways, overcurrent protection, and other equipment for branch circuits; use the NEC to size services for single-family dwellings, multi-family dwellings, offices, stores, schools, mobile homes, recreational vehicles, commercial cooking equipment, and motors; and differentiate the rules and regulations of different cities relating to meeting the requirements for taking the Master Electrician’s Exam. Prerequisites: Associate of Applied Science in Electromechanical Technology. Four lecture hours each week.

 

Electromechanical Technology – ELPT 1441 – Motor Control. Four hours credit. Operating principles of solid-state and conventional controls along with their practical applications. Includes braking, jogging, plugging, safety interlocks, wiring, and schematic diagram interpretations. Students will be able to identify practical applications of jogging and plugging; describe the types of motor braking and their operating principles; explain different starting methods for large motors; and demonstrate proper troubleshooting methods on circuits using wiring and schematic diagrams. Three lecture and two lab hours each week. Lab fee. Pre-requisite : Work Keys test section for Applied Math Level 4 and Reading for Information Level 4.

 

Electromechanical Technology – ELPT 1445 – Commercial Wiring. Four hours credit. Commercial wiring methods. Includes over-current protection, raceway panel board installation, proper grounding techniques, and associated safety procedures. Students will be able to interpret electrical blueprints/drawings; compute the circuit sizes and over-current protection needed for the installation of branch circuits, feeders, and service entrance conductors; explain the proper installation of wiring devices according to the National Electrical Code (NEC) and local electrical codes; demonstrate grounding methods; identify commercial wiring methods including conduit bending; and demonstrate proper safety procedures. Three lecture and two lab hours each week. Lab fee. Pre-requisite : Work Keys test section for Applied Math Level 4 and Reading for Information Level 4.

 

Electromechanical Technology – ELPT 2305 – Motors and Transformers. Four hours credit. Operation of single and three-phase motors and transformers. Includes transformer banking, power factor correction, and protective devices. Students will be able to match the type of single-phase motor with its principles of operation; compare the operating characteristics of the three types of three-phase motors; explain the advantages of Wye and Delta connections in motor and transit applications; size overcurrent, short circuit, and ground fault protective devices; and utilize nameplate information. Two lecture and two lab hours each week. Lab fee. Pre-requisite : Work Keys test section for Applied Math Level 4 and Reading for Information Level 4.

Electromechanical Technology – ELPT 2331 – AC/DC Drives. Three hours credit. Installation and maintenance of alternating current (AC) and direct current (DC) variable speed drives with emphasis on application, operating characteristics, and troubleshooting techniques. Students will be able to explain technical terms associated with AC and DC drive systems; differentiate between the basic types of control logic and schemes used for AC and DC speed control; compare the advantages and disadvantages of AC versus DC drive systems; program AC and DC drives for specific applications; and troubleshoot drives to board level. Two lecture and three lab hours each week. Lab fee. Pre-requisite : Work Keys test section for Applied Math Level 4 and Reading for Information Level 4.

Electromechanical Technology – ELPT 2355 – Programmable Logic Controllers II. Three hours credit. Advanced concepts in programmable logic controllers and their applications and interfacing to industrial controls. Convert ladder diagrams into programs; explain digital/analog devices used with programmable logic controllers; apply advanced programming techniques; execute and evaluate control system operation; and implement interfacing and networking schemes. Two lecture and three lab hours each week. Lab fee. Pre-requisite : Work Keys test section for Applied Math Level 4 and Reading for Information Level 4. ELPT 2419 Programmable Logic Controllers I. Students attempting this course must have a grade of B or higher in ELPT 2419 Programmable Logic Controllers I.

Electromechanical Technology – ELPT 2419 – Programmable Logic Controllers I. Four hours credit. Fundamental concepts of programmable logic controllers, principles of operation, and numbering systems as applied to electrical controls. Students will be able to Identify and describe digital logic circuits and explain numbering systems; explain the operation of programmable logic controllers; convert ladder diagrams into programs; incorporate timers and counters utilizing programmable logic controllers; and execute and evaluate programs. Two lecture and three lab hours each week. Lab fee. Pre-requisite : Work Keys test section for Applied Math Level 4 and Reading for Information Level 4.

Electromechanical Technology – ELPT 2449 – Industrial Automation. Four hours credit. Electrical control systems, applications, and interfacing utilized in industrial automation. Apply advanced programming techniques utilizing programmable logic controllers; implement digital/analog interfacing schemes; explain the operation of communication and network methods; devise control system specifications; and explain the operation and applications of distributed control systems. Two lecture and three lab hours each week. Lab fee. Pre-requisite : Work Keys test section for Applied Math Level 4 and Reading for Information Level 4. ELPT 2355 Programmable Logic Controllers II. Students attempting this course must have a grade of B or higher in ELPT 2355 Programmable Logic Controllers II.

Electromechanical Technology – ENTC 1410 – Fluid Mechanics with Applications. Four hours credit. Introduces the concepts of fluid power systems and components. Emphasizes fluid properties, measurement of pressure, viscosity and density, and flow. Three lecture hours and two lab hours each week. Prerequisite: ACT WorkKeys Applied Mathematics Level 4 and Reading for Information Level 4. Lab fee.

Electromechanical Technology – ENTC 2310 – Machine DesignThree hours credit. Design considerations for machinery. Includes selection of mechanical components and machine construction principles. Students will learn the applications and selection processes for various mechanical elements/components within basic power transmission units. Students will evaluate suitability of mechanical drive components; construct a mechanical system; establish a lubrication plan; establish a maintenance schedule; and evaluate system performance. Two lecture and two lab hours each week. Prerequisite: ACT WorkKeys Applied Mathematics Level 4 and Reading for Information Level 4. Lab fee.

Electromechanical Technology – HART 1256 – EPA Recovery Certification Preparation. Two hours credit. Certification training for HVAC refrigerant recovery, recycle, and reclaim. Instruction will provide a review of EPA guidelines for refrigerant recovery and recycling during the installation, service, and repair of all HVAC and refrigeration systems. Prerequisite: WorkKeys Test Section for Applied Math and Reading for Information. Two lecture hours each week.

 

Electromechanical Technology – HART 1303 – Air Conditioning Control Principles. Three hours credit. A basic study of HVAC and refrigeration controls; troubleshooting of control components; emphasis on use of wiring diagrams to analyze high and low voltage circuits; a review of Ohm’s law as applied to air conditioning controls and circuits. The student will test, repair, and/or replace HVAC-related electrical and control components, wiring and equipment; read, draw, and interpret high and low voltage control circuits. Two lecture and four lab hours each week. Lab fee.

 

Electromechanical Technology – HART 1310 – HVAC Shop Practices and Tools. Three hours credit. Tools and instruments used in the HVAC industry. Includes proper application, use and care of these tools, and tubing and piping practices. The student will demonstrate the use of hand tools, power tools and instruments; construct flares, swages and bends using tubing tools; use a torch for brazing and soldering; identify industry safety, and environmental regulations; and perform safety procedures. Two lecture and three lab hours each week. Lab fee.

 

Electromechanical Technology – HART 1356 – EPA Recovery Certification Preparation. Three hours credit. Certification training for HVAC refrigerant recovery, recycle and reclaim. Instruction will provide a review of EPA guidelines for refrigerant recovery and recycling during the installation, service, and repair of all HVAC and refrigeration systems. The student will learn to define refrigerant recovery, recycle and reclaim terms; explain refrigerant recovery, recycle, and reclaim procedures; analyze refrigerant recovery, recycle, and reclaim operations; identify Type 1, Type II, and Type III appliances; examine and utilize Section 608 of the Clean Air Act of 1990 Refrigerant, Recycle and Reclaim. Three lecture hours each week.

 

Electromechanical Technology – HART 1401 – Basic Electricity For HVAC.Four hours credit. Principles of electricity as required by HVAC, including proper use of test equipment, electrical circuits, and component theory and operation. Student will demonstrate knowledge of basic principles of electricity, electrical current, circuitry, and air conditioning devices; apply Ohm’s law to electrical calculations; perform electrical continuity, voltage, and current tests with appropriate meters; and demonstrate electrical safety. Three lecture and three lab hours. Lab fee.

 

Electromechanical Technology – HART 1407 – Refrigeration Principles. Four hours credit. An introduction to the refrigeration cycle, heat transfer theory, temperature/pressure relationship, refrigerant handling, refrigeration components and safety. The student will identify refrigeration components; explain operation of the basic refrigeration cycle and heat transfer; demonstrate proper application and/or use of tools, test equipment, and safety procedures. Three hours lecture and three hours lab each week. Lab fee.

 

Electromechanical Technology – HART 1441 – Residential Air Conditioning. Four hours credit. A study of components, applications, and installation of mechanical air conditioning systems including operation conditions, troubleshooting, repair, and charging of air conditioning systems. Prerequisite: HART 1401 and HART 1407. Three lecture and three lab hours each week. Lab fee.

 

Electromechanical Technology – HART 1445 – Gas And Electric Heating. Four hours credit. A study of the procedures and principles used in servicing heating systems including gas fire furnaces and electric heating systems. The student will identify different types of gas furnaces; identify and describe component operation of gas furnaces; service and troubleshoot gas furnaces; perform safety inspections on gas and electric heating systems; identify unsafe operation of gas furnaces; identify and discuss component operation of electric heating systems; and service and troubleshoot electric heating systems. Three lecture and three lab hours each week. Lab fee.

 

Electromechanical Technology – HART 2336 – Troubleshooting. Four hours credit. An advanced course in the application of troubleshooting principles and use of test instruments to diagnose air conditioning and refrigeration components and system problems including conducting performance tests. The student will test and diagnose components, systems, and accessories; complete applicable documentation. Prerequisites: HART 1401, 1303, 1407, and/or co-requisite HART 1445. One hour lecture and five hours lab each week. Lab fee.

 

Electromechanical Technology – HART 2334 – Advanced Air Conditioning. Four hours credit. Theory and practical application of electrical control devices, electromechanical controls, and/or pneumatic controls. Prerequisite: HART 1441. Two lecture and three lab hours each week. Lab fee.

 

Electromechanical Technology – HART 2441 – Commercial Air Conditioning. Four hours credit. A study of components, applications, and installation of air conditioning systems with capacities of 25 tons or less. Prerequisite: HART 1441. Three lecture and three lab hours each week. Lab fee.

 

Electromechanical Technology – HART 2442 – Commercial Refrigeration. Four hours credit. Theory and practical application in the maintenance of commercial refrigeration; medium, and low temperature applications and ice machines. Prerequisite: HART 1401 and HART 1407. Three lecture and three lab hours each week. Lab fee.

Electromechanical Technology – HYDR 1301 – Rigging and Conveying SystemsThree hours credit. Introduction to directing and moving heavy objects, selecting the appropriate rigging equipment, in conjunction with the suitable hardware and lifting devices with an emphasis on inspection, use, and maintenance of rigging equipment. Two lecture hours and two lab hours each week. Prerequisite: ACT WorkKeys Applied Mathematics Level 4 and Reading for Information Level 4.  Lab fee.

Electromechanical Technology – HYDR 1350 – Hydraulics, Fabrication & Repair. Three hours credit. Fabrication of hydraulic power units to provide fluid power for an industrial or mobile operation.  Includes techniques and methods of constructing conduits and fittings.  The student will demonstrate fabrication of power units; interpret blueprints and specifications; demonstrate disassembly, repair, and reassembly of hydraulic components; and analyze failed components. Two lecture hours and two lab hours each week. Prerequisite: ACT WorkKeys Applied Mathematics Level 4 and Reading for Information Level 4.  Lab fee.

Electromechanical Technology – HYDR 1391 – Special Topics In Hydraulics Technology/Technician. Three hours credit. Topics address recently identified current events, skills, knowledge, and/or attitudes and behaviors pertinent to the technology or occupation and relevant to the professional development of the student. This course was designed to be repeated multiple times to improve student proficiency. The student outcomes/objectives are determined by local occupational need and business and industry trends. Three lecture and lab hours each week. Prerequisite: ACT WorkKeys Applied Mathematics Level 4 and Reading for Information Level 4.  Lab fee.

Electromechanical Technology – HYDR 1409 – Basic Fluid Power I (Hydraulics). Four hours credit. An introduction to the basic principles of hydraulic pressure, flow, and system components, including system controls, symbols, and circuits. The student will state Pascal’s law and its consequences involving pressure; state the continuity equation and explain its application to the flow rate; name the basic hydraulic system components and state the function of each; calculate pressure, force, or actuator size given any two parameters; and determine proper conductor size given flow and velocity parameters. Three lecture hours and two lab hours each week.Prerequisite: ACT WorkKeys Applied Mathematics Level 4 and Reading for Information Level 4.  Lab fee.

Electromechanical Technology – HYDR 1415 – Basic Fluid Power II (Pneumatics). Four hours credit. An introduction to the basic principles of pneumatic pressure, flow, and system components, symbols, and circuits. Emphasis on troubleshooting techniques, good maintenance procedures, and safety practices. The student will state Pascal’s law and its consequences involving pressure; explain the general gas law and its applications; identify the basic pneumatic system components; state the function of each component; calculate pressure, force, or actuator size given any two parameters; and determine compressor size given flow rate, pressure, and actuator requirements. Three lecture hours and two lab hours each week.Prerequisite: ACT WorkKeys Applied Mathematics Level 4 and Reading for Information Level 4.  Lab fee.

Electromechanical Technology – HYDR 2330 – Fluid Power System Design. Three hours credit. Advanced operation of control valves and their controls for open and closed loop systems. Topics include filtration requirements for hydraulic systems; operation of hydraulic circuits; design circuits, including hydraulics, pneumatics, electrical/electronic controls, and mechanical interface. Two lecture and three lab hours each week. Prerequisite: ACT WorkKeys Applied Mathematics Level 4 and Reading for Information Level 4.  Lab fee.

Electromechanical Technology – HYDR 2455 – Hydraulics Proportional & Servo Valves. Four hours credit. Electronics and instrumentation associated with hydraulic proportional and servo valves. The student will identify servo or proportional valves for specific applications; demonstrate troubleshooting techniques for proportional and servo valves; and systems. Prerequisite/co-requisite: HYDR 2459. Three lecture hours and two lab hours each week.Prerequisite: ACT WorkKeys Applied Mathematics Level 4 and Reading for Information Level 4.  Lab fee.

Electromechanical Technology – HYDR 2459 – Advanced Hydraulics. Four hours credit. A study of cylinder loading, accumulator volume, positive and negative loads and specialty valves. The student will calculate positive and negative loads; calculate side load on cylinder rods; calculate the volume of fluid in an accumulator; and utilize specialty valves. Prerequisite: HYDR 1409 or HYDR 1415. Three lecture hours and two lab hours each week.Prerequisite: ACT WorkKeys Applied Mathematics Level 4 and Reading for Information Level 4.  Lab fee.

Electromechanical Technology – INTC 1301 – Principles of Industrial Measurements. Three hours credit. A study of the principles and devices for the measurement of control variables such as temperature, pressure, flow, level, and basic control functions. The student will demonstrate the fundamentals of tubing layout and bending; apply the principles of process instruments and devices; and describe the control loop as applied to control and detection of pressure, temperature, level, flow, etc. Three lecture hours each week. Prerequisite Associate of Applied Science in Electromechanical Technology. Lab fee.

 

Electromechanical Technology – INTC 2359 – Distributed Control Systems. Three hours credit. Philosophy and application of distributed control systems. Includes hardware, firmware, software, configuration, communications and networking systems required to implement a distributed control strategy. Corequisite: TECM 1301. Two lecture and three lab hours each week. Lab fee.

 

Electronics Technology – CETT 1325 – Digital Fundamentals. Three hours credit. An entry level course in digital electronics to include numbering systems, logic gates, Boolean algebra, and combinational logic. Students will be able to construct digital circuits such as combinational logic circuits, clocking and timing circuits, and troubleshoot various digital circuits using schematic diagrams. Students will be able to construct various control systems using digital logic and interface circuitry. Corequisite: TECM 1303. Two lecture and two lab hours each week. Lab fee.

 

Electronics Technology – CETT 1349 – Digital Systems. Three hours credit. An entry level course in digital electronics to include numbering systems, logic gates, Boolean algebra, and combinational logic. Students will be able to construct digital circuits such as combinational logic circuits, clocking and timing circuits, and troubleshoot various digital circuits using schematic diagrams. Students will be able to construct various control systems using digital logic and interface circuitry. Prerequisite: CETT 1325. Two lecture and two lab hours each week. Lab fee.

 

Electronics Technology – CETT 1409 – DC-AC Circuits. Four hours credit. Fundamentals of DC circuits and AC circuits operation including Ohm’s law, Kirchhoff’s laws, networks, transformers, resonance, phasors, capacitive and inductive and circuit analysis techniques. Students will construct and analyze DC and AC circuits from simple to complex; perform test measurements; and utilize a multimeter and oscilloscope to differentiate between two AC signals with respect to voltage, current, and power. Corequisite: TECM 1303. Three lecture and two lab hours each week. Lab fee.

 

Electronics Technology – CETT 1457 – Linear Integrated Circuits. Four hours credit. A study of the characteristics, operations and testing of linear integrated circuits. Applications include instrumentation and active filtering. Students will construct and troubleshoot circuits containing linear integrated circuits. Prerequisite: CETT 1409. Three lecture and two lab hours each week. Lab Fee.

 

Electronics Technology – CETT 2437 – Microcomputer Control. Four hours credit. A study of microprocessors and microcomputers with an emphasis on embedded controllers for industrial and commercial applications. Students will be able to interface a microcontroller to monitor and control an industrial application. Prerequisite: CETT 1409. Two lecture and four lab hours each week. Lab fee.

 

Electronics Technology – CPMT 1311 – Introduction to Computer Maintenance. Three hours credit. A study of the information for the assembly of a microcomputer system. Emphasis is on the evolution of the microprocessor and microprocessor bus structures. The student will identify modules that make up a computer system and its operation; identify each type of computer bus structure; and assemble/setup microcomputer systems, accessory boards, and install/connect associated peripherals. Prerequisite: or concurrent enrollment in TECM 1303. Textbook must be purchased from Angelina College Bookstore. Two lecture and two lab hours each week. Lab fee.

 

Electronics Technology – ITSC 1305 – Introduction to PC Operating Systems. Three hours credit. A study of personal computer operating systems. Topics include installation and configuration, file management, memory and storage management, control of peripheral devices, and use of utilities. The student will install, configure, and maintain the operating system; perform basic file management operations; organize and allocate primary and secondary storage; access and control peripheral devices; and demonstrate the use of utilities. Prerequisite: CPMT 1311 or concurrent enrollment. Textbook must be purchased from Angelina College Bookstore. Two lecture and two lab hours each week. Lab fee.

 

Electronics Technology – ITCC 1314 CCNA 1: Introduction to Networks. This course covers networking architecture, structure, and functions; introduces the principles and structure of IP addressing and the fundamentals of Ethernet concepts, media and operations to provide a foundation for the curriculum. Introduces the students to programming routers and switches. Two lecture and two lab hours per week.Lab fee.

 

Electronics Technology – ITCC 1340 CCNA 2: Routing and Switching Essentials. Describes the architecture, components, and basic operation of routers and explains the basic principles of routing and routing protocols. It also provides and in-depth understanding of how switches operate and are implemented in the LAN environment for small and large networks. Two lecture and two lab hours per week. Prerequisites: ITCC 1314. Lab fee.

 

Electronics Technology – ITCC 2312 CCNA 3: Scaling Networks –CCNA R&S. Scaling Networks (ScaN) covers the architecture, components, and operations of routers and switches in larger and more complex networks. Students learn how to configure routers and switches using advanced protocols. Two lecture and two lab hours per week. Prerequisites, ITCC1314, ITCC1340. Lab fee.

 

Electronics Technology – ITCC 2313 CCNA 4: WAN. Technologies and network services required by converged applications in a complex network; enables students to understand the selection criteria of network devices and WAN technologies to meet network requirements. Two lecture and two lab hours per week Prerequisites: ITCC 1314, ITCC 1340, and ITCC 2312. Lab fee.

 

Electronics Technology LOTT 1301 – Introduction to Fiber Optics. Three credit hours. An introductory course in fiber optics and its application, including advantages of fiber, light transmission in fiber, types of fiber, sources, detectors, and connectors. Prerequisite: Proficiency on work keys, reading and mathematics. Two lecture and two lab hours each week. Lab fee.

Engineering – ENGR 1304 – Engineering Graphics I. Three hours credit. An introductory course including the use of instruments, computer graphics, geometrical construction, orthographic projections, auxiliaries, sections, dimensioning, axonometric projection, threads, and descriptive geometry applications. Two lecture and four lab hours each week. Lab fee.

 

Engineering – ENGR 1305 – Engineering Graphics II. Three hours credit. A course involving the principles and application of orthographic projections, including space relation of points, lines, and planes; true length lines in space, intersection and development of space surfaces and curved surfaces; vectors, shades, and shadows. Two lecture and four lab hours each week. Prerequisite: ENGR 1304. Lab fee.
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Human Services – CMSW 1191 – Basic Family Assessment. One credit hour. Topics address recently identified current events, skills, knowledge, and/or attitudes and behaviors pertinent to the technology or occupation and relevant to the professional development of the student. This course was designed to be repeated multiple times to improve student proficiency. Learning outcomes/objectives are determined by local occupational need and business and industry trends. This course examines assessments commonly used in social services that focus on family systems. Co-requisite: PMHS 1280 – Cooperative Education I. One semester hour credit. One lecture hour per week.

 

Human Services – CMSW 1309 – Problems of Children and Adolescents. Three hours credit. Examine common problems and evaluate effective prevention and intervention models of at-risk children and youth. Topics include social, family, educational systems impact, juvenile delinquency, teen sexuality, and mental health including addictive behaviors to promote wellness. Prerequisites: SCWK 1321. Three semester hours credit. Three lecture hours per week.

 

Human Services – CMSW 1313 – Assessment and Service Delivery. Three hours credit. A study of interviewing and assessment instruments and approaches for working with multicultural populations.  Emphasis is on service delivery systems in human services. Topics include awareness of commonly used assessments, ethical standards of practice, awareness of multicultural issues and competence in service delivery. Students will identify commonly used assessments including a psychosocial history; articulate client rights and ethical responsibilities; describe limitations of confidentiality; identify community resources; and create alliances with multidisciplinary professionals. Students will demonstrate appropriate results reporting to clients in hypothetical service situations. Three semester hours credit. Three lecture hours per week.

 

Human Services – CMSW 1327- Treatment Modalities for Special Populations. Three hours credit. An introduction to evidence-based treatment methods with special populations including ethnic minorities, elderly, children, youth, alternative lifestyles, persons with addictions or mental health issues. Co-requisite: DAAC or PMHS 2280/2281. Prerequisites: SCWK 1321, CMSW 1313 and DAAC 1311. Three semester hours credit. Three lecture hours per week.

 

Human Services – CMSW 1353 – Family Intervention Strategies. Three hours credit. The study of current family intervention strategies. The student will distinguish between major theories of assessment, intervention and treatment in families. Students will also develop self-awareness as connected to the family system. Prerequisite: SCWK 1321. Three semester hours credit. Three lecture hours per week.

 

Human Services – DAAC 1311 – Counseling Theories. Three credit hours. An examination of the major theories and current treatment modalities used in the field of counseling. Students will Identify major counseling theories; define and explain techniques relevant to the various theories; and identify major approaches to treatment. Ethics and professional standards in counseling will also be examined, along with the student’s development as a helper in the Human Services profession. Prerequisites: SCWK 1321 – Basic Counseling Skills. Three semester hours credit. Three lecture hours per week.

 

Human Services – DAAC 1417 – Orientation to Social Services. Four semester credit hours. An overview and application of the basic counseling skills and techniques, including communication skills necessary to develop an effective helping relationship with individuals and families, including diverse clients from special populations. Students will identify basic counseling skills and techniques, and practice various counseling techniques in an assigned setting. Prerequisite: SCWK 1321, Basic Counseling Skills. Four semester hours credit. Four lecture hours per week. Includes lab for counseling skills practice.

 

Human Services – GERS 1343- Psychology of Adult Development and Aging. Three semester hours credit. Study of the cognitive aspects of adult development and ageing. Includes common cognitive disorders that affect the individual during the aging process, with emphasis on mental health and optimum development. Students will identify psychological theories of aging; describe cognitive development of older adults; describe the impact of social factors on adult development; assess the individual’s psychological response to aging, including a research-based project interviewing an elder; and examine perspectives regarding death and dying. Pre-requisites: SCWK 1321. Three semester hours credit. Three lecture hours per week.

 

Human Services – GERS 1345 – Policies and Programs for Older Adults. Three hours credit. Students will identify the public policies and programs designed to address issues related to older adults, including the identification of the least restrictive living environment for elder services. Students will identify services and programs available for older adults; identify common themes in public policy related to aging; analyze the impact of public policies and programs; and develop strategies to impact the creation of public policy related to older adults. Prerequisite: SCWK 1321. Three semester hours credit. Three lecture hours per week.

 

Human Services – PMHS 1280 – Cooperative Education I – Psychiatric/Mental Health Services Technician. Two-semester hour’s credit. Career related activities in the student’s area of specialization are offered through an individualized agreement among the college, employer (state, regional and local human services agencies), and student. Under supervision of the college and the employer, the student combines classroom learning with work experience. Includes a lecture component. As outlined in the learning plan, the student will apply the theory, concepts, and skills involving specialized materials, tools, equipment, procedures, regulations, laws, and interactions within and among political, economic, environmental, social, and legal systems associated with the occupation and the business/industry and will demonstrate legal and ethical behavior, safety practices, interpersonal and teamwork skills, and appropriate written and verbal communication skills using the terminology of the occupation and the business/industry. Students will complete a research project based on their assigned placement agencies. Prerequisite: SCWK 1321 – Basic Counseling Skills. Co-requisite: CMSW 1191- Basic Family Assessment. Two semester hours credit. Two hours of lecture each week

 

Human Services – PMHS 2280 – Cooperative Education II – Psychiatric/Mental Health Services Technician. Two semester hours credit. Career related activities in the student’s area of specialization are offered through an individualized agreement among the college, employer (state, regional and local human services agencies), and student. Under supervision of the college and the employer, the student combines classroom learning with work experience. Includes a lecture component. As outlined in the learning plan, the student will apply the theory, concepts, and skills involving specialized materials, tools, equipment, procedures, regulations, laws, and interactions within and among political, economic, environmental, social, and legal systems associated with the occupation and the business/industry and will demonstrate legal and ethical behavior, safety practices, interpersonal and teamwork skills, and appropriate written and verbal communication skills using the terminology of the occupation and the business/industry. Students will complete a research project reflecting counseling theories practiced at their placement agencies. Prerequisite: SCWK 1321 and PMHS 1280. Co-requisite: PSYT 2301 – Psychology of Group Dynamics, or CMSW 1327-Treatment Modalities of Special Populations. Two semester hours credit. Two hours of lecture each week. . 100 clock hours of field experience required.

 

Human Services – PMHS 2281 – Cooperative Education III – Psychiatric/Mental Health Services Technician. Two semester hours credit. Career related activities in the student’s area of specialization are offered through an individualized agreement among the college, employer (state, regional and local human services agencies), and student. Under supervision of the college and the employer, the student combines classroom learning with work experience. Includes a lecture component. As outlined in the learning plan, the student will apply the theory, concepts, and skills involving specialized materials, tools, equipment, procedures, regulations, laws, and interactions within and among political, economic, environmental, social, and legal systems associated with the occupation and the business/industry and will demonstrate legal and ethical behavior, safety practices, interpersonal and teamwork skills, and appropriate written and verbal communication skills using the terminology of the occupation and the business/industry. Students will complete a research project to prepare for entering the workforce in human services. Prerequisite: DAAC 1311, PSYT 2321 and PMHS 2280. Co-requisite: PSYT 2301 – Psychology of Group Dynamics, or CMSW 1327-Treatment Modalities of Special Populations. Two semester hours credit. Two hours of lecture each week. 100 clock hours of field experience required.

 

Human Services – PSYT 2301 – Psychology of Group Dynamics. Three hours credit. Exploration of group counseling skills, techniques, stages of group development, confidentiality and ethics; and group leader roles, leadership and facilitation. Students will differentiate between types of groups; describe the basic stages of the group process; participate in development of group leadership skills; cite examples of client documentation and use of record keeping skills; and identify issues of confidentiality. Co-requisite: PMHS 2280 or 2281 – Cooperative Education II or III. Prerequisites: PMHS 1280 and DAAC 1311. Three semester hours credit. Three lecture hours per week. Lab included for practice of group leadership skills.

 

Human Services – PSYT 2321– Crisis Intervention. Three hours credit. Examination of crisis management and intervention theories in assisting clients in crisis situations. Topics include coping skills to increase emotional or behavioral stability through resolution of crisis and suicide assessment and intervention. Students will apply principles and theories of crisis intervention and demonstrate crisis intervention skills in a practice environment. Prerequisite: SCWK 1321. Three semester credit hours per week. Three lecture hours each week.

 

Human Services – PSYT 2331 – Abnormal Psychology. Three semester hours credit. Examination and assessment of the symptoms, etiology, and treatment procedures of mental, emotional, and behavioral disorders. Study will focus on clinical disorders, including mood and anxiety disorders. Students will analyze symptomatic disorders; and design treatment plans and strategies. Prerequisite: SCWK 1321, Basic Counseling Skills and DAAC 1311, Counseling Theories. Three semester hours credit. Three lecture hours each week..

 

Human Services – SCWK 1321 – Basic Counseling Skills. Three credit hours. Introduction to the basic concepts, information, and practices within the field of social services.  Topics include a survey of the historical development of social services; populations served by social service workers; and review of current treatment and/or services. Students will describe the historical development of social services; discuss terminology used by social service providers; assess client needs to determine eligibility for social service programs; compare and contrast the populations served including treatments and resources and utilize ethical principles. Prerequisite: None. Three semester credit hours. Three lecture hours per week.

 

Human Services – SCWK 2301- Assessment and Case Management. Three hours credit. Exploration of procedures to identify and evaluate an individual’s and/or family’s strengths, weaknesses, problems, and needs in order to develop an effective plan of action. Topics include oral and written communications essential for screening, assessment, and case management to determine the need for prevention, intervention and/or referral and probable case management needs for at-risk populations. Students will describe the steps in screening, assessment, and case management; gather relevant information from client and secondary sources; and apply knowledge of assessment skills of special population clients. Prerequisites: CMSW 1313, Assessment and Service Delivery, DAAC 1311, Counseling Theories, and PSYT 2321, Crisis Intervention. Three semester hours credit. Three lecture hours per week.
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Legal Assistant – LGLA 1119 – Legal Ethics & Professional Responsibility. One hour credit. The ethical and legal responsibilities and duties that a member of the legal profession owes to the public, the court, clients, and other professional colleagues. Includes a review of the canons, codes, and rules of professional responsibility. The student will define and properly use terminology related to legal ethics; describe the ethical responsibilities of lawyers and law office personnel; recognize breaches of ethical obligations that may result in malpractice or disciplinary actions; and demonstrate knowledge of the canons of legal ethics governing legal professionals. Prerequisite or concurrent enrollment in LGLA 1307. One lecture hour per week.

 

Legal Assistant – LGLA 1303 – Legal Research. Three hours credit. Law library techniques and computer-assisted legal research. The student will locate, read and understand primary and secondary legal authority; design and implement effective research strategies; and be familiar with computer-assisted legal research tools and the proper role of these tools. Prerequisite: LGLA 1307. Three lecture hours per week with extensive outside use of legal research resources.

 

Legal Assistant – LGLA 1307 – Introduction to Law and the Legal Profession. Three hours credit. This course provides an overview of the law and of legal professions. Topics include legal concepts, systems and terminology; ethical obligations and regulations; professional trends and issues with particular emphasis on the paralegal. The student will develop a legal vocabulary; explain fundamental legal concepts and systems; explain the ethical obligations of the legal profession with particular emphasis on the paralegal’s role; and discuss topics relating to the paralegal profession. Three lecture hours each week.

 

Legal Assistant – LGLA 1345 – Civil Litigation. Three hours credit. This course presents fundamental concepts and procedures of civil litigation with emphasis on the paralegal’s role. Topics include pretrial, trial, and post-trial phases of litigation. The student will define and properly use terminology relating to civil litigation; locate, describe, and analyze sources of law relating to the civil litigation and applicable court rules; describe and analyze other sources of law relating to constitutional law; locate, U.S. Constitution and its amendments. Prerequisite or concurrent enrollment in LGLA 1307. Three lecture hours each week.

 

Legal Assistant – LGLA 1351 – Contracts. Three hours credit. This course presents fundamental concepts of contract law with emphasis on the paralegal’s role. Topics include formation, performance, and enforcement of contracts under the common law and the Uniform Commercial Code. The student will define and properly use terminology relating to contract law; locate, describe, and analyze sources of law relating to contract law; describe the role and ethical obligations of the paralegal relating to contract law; and draft documents commonly used in contract law. Prerequisite or concurrent enrollment in LGLA 1307. Three lecture hours each week.

 

Legal Assistant – LGLA 1353 – Wills, Trusts and Probate Administration. Three hours credit. This course presents fundamental concepts of the law of wills, trusts, and probate administration with emphasis on the paralegal’s role. The student will define and properly use terminology relating to wills, trusts, and probate administration; locate, describe, and analyze sources of law relating to wills, trusts, and probate administration; describe the role and ethical obligations of the paralegal relating to wills, trusts, and probate administration; and draft documents commonly used in wills, trusts, and probate administration. Prerequisite or concurrent enrollment in LGLA 1307. Three lecture hours each week.

 

Legal Assistant – LGLA 1355 – Family Law. Three hours credit. This course presents fundamental concepts of family law with emphasis on the paralegal’s role. Topics include formal and informal marriages, divorce, annulment, marital property, and the parent-child relationship. The student will define and properly use terminology relating to family law; locate, describe, and analyze sources of law relating to family law; describe the role and ethical obligations of the paralegal relating to family law; and draft documents commonly used in family law. Prerequisite or concurrent enrollment in LGLA 1307. Three lecture hours each week.

 

Legal Assistant – LGLA 1391 – Special Topics in Paralegal/Legal Assistant. Three hours credit. Topics address recently identified current events, skills, knowledge, and/or attitudes and behaviors pertinent to the technology or occupation and relevant to the professional development of the student. This course was designed to be repeated multiple times to improve student proficiency. Learning outcomes/objectives are determined by local occupational need and business and industry trends. Prerequisites: Completion of 45 hours in the program including LGLA 1303 and LGLA 1307. Three lecture hours each week.

 

Legal Assistant – LGLA 2166 – Practicum (or Field Experience). One hour credit. Practical general workplace training supported by an individualized learning plan developed by the employer, college and student. As outlined in the learning plan, the student will apply the theory, concepts, and skills involving specialized tools, materials, equipment, procedures, regulations, laws and interactions within and among political, economic, environmental, social and legal systems associated with the occupation and the business/industry and will demonstrate legal and ethical behavior, safety practices, interpersonal and teamwork skills, appropriate verbal and written communication skills using the terminology of the occupation and the business/industry. Prerequisites: LGLA 1303, 1307, 1345, 1351, 2303, 2309 and 2313 or permission of the instructor. Minimum six hours per week practicum and lecture one hour per week.

Legal Assistant – LGLA 2266 Practicum (or Field Experience). Two hours credit. Practical general workplace training supported by an individualized learning plan developed by the employer, college and student. As outlined in the learning plan, the student will apply the theory, concepts, and skills involving specialized tools, materials, equipment, procedures, regulations, laws and interactions within and among political, economic, environmental, social and legal systems associated with the occupation and the business/industry and will demonstrate legal and ethical behavior, safety practices, interpersonal and teamwork skills, appropriate verbal and written communication skills using the terminology of the occupation and the business/industry. Prerequisites: LGLA 1303, 1307, 1345, 1351, 2303, 2309 and 2313 or permission of the instructor. Minimum thirteen hours per week practicum and lecture one hour per week.

 

Legal Assistant – LGLA 2303 – Torts and Personal Injury Law.Three hours credit. This course presents fundamental concepts of tort law with emphasis on the paralegal’s role. Topics include intentional torts, negligence, and strict liability. The student will define and properly use terminology relating to tort law; locate, describe, and analyze sources of law relating to tort law; describe the role and ethical obligations of the paralegal in tort law; and draft documents commonly used in tort law. Prerequisite or concurrent enrollment in LGLA 1307. Three lecture hours each week.

 

Legal Assistant – LGLA 2305 – Interviewing and Investigating. Three hours credit. This course is a study of principles, methods, and investigative techniques utilized to locate, gather, document and manage information. Emphasis on developing interviewing and investigative skills to prepare the paralegal to communicate effectively while recognizing ethical problems. The student will conduct effective interviews with clients and witnesses in preparation for alternative dispute resolution and litigation processes; utilize multiple sources of information; and apply ethical standards in interviewing and investigation. Prerequisite or concurrent enrollment in LGLA 1307. Three lecture hours each week.

 

Legal Assistant – LGLA 2309 – Real Property.Three hours credit. This course presents fundamental concepts of real property law with emphasis on the paralegal’s role. Topics include the nature of real property, rights and duties of ownership, land use, voluntary and involuntary conveyances, and the recording of and searching for real estate documents. The student will define and properly use terminology relating to real property; locate, describe, and analyze sources of law relating to real property; describe the role and ethical obligations of the paralegal relating to real property transactions; and draft documents commonly used in real property transactions. Prerequisite or concurrent enrollment in LGLA 1307. Three lecture hours each week.

 

Legal Assistant – LGLA 2313 – Criminal Law and Procedure. Three hours credit. Procedures from arrest to final disposition, principles of federal and state law, and the preparation of pleadings and motions as applied to paralegals. The student will define and properly use terminology relating to criminal law; locate and analyze cases and statutes relating to criminal law; evaluate the role and ethical obligations of the paralegal relating to criminal law; and draft documents commonly used in criminal law. Prerequisite or concurrent enrollment in LGLA 1307. Three lecture hours each week.

 

Legal Assistant – LGLA 2331 – Advanced Legal Research and Writing. Three hours credit. Computerized research techniques and preparation of complex legal documents such as briefs, legal office memoranda, and citation forms. The student will analyze complex legal issues; apply effective research strategies to resolve those issues and report the results in an acceptable written legal format. Prerequisite: LGLA 1307, prerequisite LGLA 1303 or approval of the instructor. Three lecture hours each week.

 

Legal Assistant – LGLA 2337 – Mediation. Three hours credit. Alternative dispute resolution. Alternative dispute resolution. Emphasizes the role of the paralegal in mediation. Include differences between mediation and arbitration, the process of mediation, and dispute resolution techniques. The student will compare and contrast various methods of alternative dispute resolution; apply negotiation and mediation techniques; and analyze ethical issues relating to alternative dispute resolution. Prerequisite or concurrent enrollment in LGLA 1307. Three lecture hours each week.

 

Legal Assistant – LGLA 2366 – Practicum (or Field Experience). Three hours credit. Developed by the employer, college and student. As outlined in the learning plan, the student will apply the theory, concepts, and skills involving specialized tools, materials, equipment, procedures, regulations, laws and interactions within and among political, economic, environmental, social and legal systems associated with the occupation and the business/industry and will demonstrate legal and ethical behavior, safety practices, interpersonal and teamwork skills, appropriate verbal and written communication skills using the terminology of the occupation and the business/industry. Prerequisites: LGLA 1303, 1307, 1345, 1351, 2303, 2309 and 2313 or permission of the of the instructor. Minimum twenty hours per week practicum and one lecture hour each week.

 

Legal Assistant – LGLA 2371 – Advanced Criminal Law and Procedure. Three hours credit. Advanced concepts of the procedural rules of criminal cases in Texas. This class will be focused primarily on Texas criminal procedural rules, as opposed to federal criminal procedure. The students will learn how a criminal case procedurally goes through the Texas system, including studying criminal investigation (search warrants, arrest warrants, etc), arrests v. investigatory stops, booking, first appearance, bail procedures, examining trials, grand jury, indictments, pre-trial matters, motions to suppress, criminal discovery, motions in limine, plea bargaining, negotiations and procedures, jury selection, trial proceedings, various rules of evidence that apply to Texas criminal cases, appellate procedures, and the paralegal’s role and job opportunities in the criminal justice system. Prerequisite or concurrent enrollment in LGLA 1307.Three lecture hours each week.

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Machine Tool Technology – MCHN 1190 – Special Topics in Machine Shop Assistant. One hour credit. Topics address recently identified current events, skills, knowledge, and/or attitudes and behaviors pertinent to the technology or occupation and relevant to the professional development of the student. This course was designed to be repeated multiple times to improve student proficiency. Must be taken with MCHN 1441.

 

Machine Tool Technology – MCHN 1191 – Special Topics in Machine Shop Assistant. One hour credit. Topics address recently identified current events, skills, knowledge, and/or attitudes and behaviors pertinent to the technology or occupation and relevant to the professional development of the student. To be repeated once for credit. Must be taken with MCHN 1452 and MCHN 1454.

 

Machine Tool Technology – MCHN 1343 – Machine Shop Mathematics. Three hours credit. Designed to prepare the student with technical, applied mathematics skills that will be necessary in future machine shop-related courses. The student will define the use of formulas and identify conversion methods of numbering systems; convert fractions to decimals and back; use formulas in solving measurement problems; and compute correctly by adding, subtracting, multiplying, and dividing whole numbers, decimals, fractions and mixed numbers. Proficiency on work keys, reading and mathematics. Three hours lecture each week.

 

Machine Tool Technology – MCHN 1426 – Introduction to CAM. Four hours credit. A study of Computer-Assisted Manufacturing (CAM) systems. Software is used to develop application for manufacturing. Emphasis is on tool geometry, tool selection, and the tool library. The student will demonstrate knowledge of Computer-Assisted Manufacturing systems, create, download, and machine parts using Computer-Assisted Manufacturing software. Prerequisites: DFTG 1325, MCHN 1343, and 1438. Two hours lecture and four hours lab each week. Lab fee.

 

Machine Tool Technology – MCHN 1438 – Machining I. Four hours credit. An introduction to machine shop theory, math and terminology, basic bench work, and part layout using a variety of common measuring tools. Application of basic operation of machine tools, such as handsaws, grinders, drill presses, lathes and mills with common hand tools. The student will identify machine parts and their functions; select layout tools and techniques; define machine shop terminology; perform basic machine setups; calculate common shop formulas; perform semi-precision and precision layout; execute grinding techniques; demonstrate basic machine operations; and apply proper measuring tools. Proficiency on work keys, reading and mathematics. Two lecture and four lab hours each week. Lab fee.

 

Machine Tool Technology – MCHN 1441 – Basic Machine Shop II.Four hours credit. A continuation of Basic Machine Shop I. The student will identify machine parts and their function; select layout tools and techniques; define machine shop terminology; perform basic machine setups; calculate common shop formulas; perform semi-precision layout; execute grinding techniques; demonstrate basic machine operations; and apply proper measuring tools. Prerequisite: MCHN 1438. Two lecture and four lab hours each week. Lab fee.

 

Machine Tool Technology – MCHN 1452 – Intermediate Machining I. Four hours credit. Operation of drills, milling machines, lathes, and power saws. Introduction to precision measuring tools. The student will use shop machine tools and measuring tools; use shop machinery and tools in a safe manner; and use precision measuring instruments to defined tolerances. Prerequisite: MCHN 1441. Two lecture and four lab hours each week. Lab fee.

 

Machine Tool Technology – MCHN 1454 – Intermediate Machining II. Four hours credit. This course provides further instruction in the operation of lathes, milling machines, surface grinders to produce more advanced knowledge and projects. OD and ID grinding will also be covered. Development of job process plan to include operation of lathes, milling machines, drill presses, and power saws. Set-up, layout, and tool maintenance is included. Emphasis on shop safety and preventative maintenance. Two lecture and four laboratory hours each week. Prerequisite MCHN 1452. Lab fee.

 

Machine Tool Technology – MCHN 2431 – Operation of CNC Turning Centers. Four hours credit. CNC operations with emphasis on turning centers, programming, setup, tool selection and machine operation. Three lecture and three lab hours per week. Lab fee.

 

Machine Tool Technology – MCHN 2438 – Advanced Computer-Assisted Manufacturing (CAM). Four hours credit. Use Computer-Aided Manufacturing (CAM) software to create multi-axis part programs; transfer programs to the machine control unit; and machine parts. Two lecture and four lab hours each week. Prerequisite MCHN 1426. Lab fee.

 

Machine Tool Technology – MCHN 2441 – Advanced Machining Operations I. Four hours credit. An advanced study of lathe and milling operations. Emphasis is on advanced cutting operations of the lathe and milling machines, including the use of carbide insert tooling, special tooling, bench assembly, and materials metallurgy. The student will identify and apply special tooling for the lathe and milling machines; interpret advanced operation formulas; list machine and work setup procedures; identify and select proper materials for machining of specific materials; calculate feeds and speeds; calculate machine movements; perform advanced lathe and milling machine setup operations; and perform advanced machining operation to specifications. Prerequisite: Associate of Applied Science in Machine Tool Technology. Two lecture and four lab hours each week. Lab fee.

 

Machine Tool Technology – MCHN 2445 – Advanced Machining Operations II. Four hours credit. Advanced milling, drilling, grinding, and lathe operations to close tolerance dimensions. Emphasis is on job planning and advanced uses of precision measuring instruments. The student will hold close tolerances on mills, lathes, drills, and grinders; and make complicated setup on lathes, mills, grinders, and drills. Prerequisite: MCHN 2441. Two lecture and four lab hours each week. Lab fee.

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Technical Math – TECM 1301 – Industrial Mathematics. Specific mathematical calculations required by business, industry, and health occupations. Solve technical math problems using addition, subtraction, multiplication, and division; convert between whole numbers, factions, mixed numbers, and decimals’ perform calculations involving percents, ratios, and proportions; and convert numbers to different units of measurement. Three lecture hours each week.

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Welding – WLDG 1337 – Introduction to Welding Metallurgy. Three hours credit. A study of ferrous and non-ferrous metals from the ore to the finished product. Emphasis is on metal alloys, heat-treating, hard surfacing, welding techniques, forging, foundry processes, and mechanical properties of metals including hardness, machineability, and ductility. The student will describe technical terms used in the various phases of metallurgy, from early history to classification of steel; will discuss ferrous and non-ferrous metals and how they are processed and used in industry; and describe mechanical and physical properties, surface treatments, and heat treatments of metals. Prerequisite: Work Keys test sections for Applied Math Level 4 and Reading for Information Level 4.  Three lecture hours each week. Lab fee.

 

Welding – WLDG 1391 – Special Topics in Welder/Welding Technologist. Three hours credit. Topics address recently identified current events, skills, knowledge, and/or attitudes and behaviors pertinent to the technology or occupation and relevant to the professional development of the student. This course was designed to be repeated multiple times to improve student proficiency. The student outcomes/objectives are determined by local occupational need and business and industry trends. Prerequisite: Work Keys test sections for Applied Math Level 4 and Reading for Information Level 4. Must have completed 32 credit hours of welding. Three lecture hours each week.

 

Welding – WLDG 1421 – Intro to Welding Fundamentals. Four hours credit. An introduction to the fundamentals of equipment used in oxyacetylene and arc welding, including welding and cutting safety, basic oxyacetylene welding and cutting, basic arc welding processes and basic metallurgy. The student will demonstrate safety procedures associated with oxyacetylene and arc processes; perform basic welds using oxyacetylene and arc welding equipment; and identify ferrous and non-ferrous metals. Work Keys test sections for Applied Math Level 4 and Reading for Information Level 4. Two lecture and four lab hours each week. Lab fee.

 

Welding – WLDG 1428 – Intro to Shielded Metal Arc Welding (SMAW). Four hours credit. An introduction to shielded metal arc welding (SMAW) process. Emphasis is on power sources, electrode selection, oxy-fuel cutting, and various joint designs. Instruction provided in SMAW fillet welds in various positions. The student will select electrodes and amperage settings for various thicknesses of materials and welding positions; define principles of arc welding; and interpret electrode classifications. The student will perform SMAW operations in various positions using selected electrodes and different joint designs. Two lecture and four lab hours each week. Work Keys test sections for Applied Math Level 4 and Reading for Information Level 4.   Pre or corequisite: WLDG 1421. Lab fee.

 

Welding – WLDG 1435 – Intro to Pipe Welding. Four hours credit. An introduction to welding of pipe using the shielded metal arc welding process, including electrode selection, equipment setup, and safe shop practices. Emphasis is on weld positions 1G and 2 G using various electrodes. The student will describe equipment and required pipe preparation and perform 1G an 2G welds using various electrodes. Two lecture and four lab hours each week. Work Keys test sections for Applied Math Level 4 and Reading for Information Level 4. Pre or corequisite: WLDG 2443. Lab fee.

 

Welding – WLDG 1457 – Intermediate Shielded Metal Arc Welding (SMAW). Four hours credit. A study of the production of various fillets and groove welds. Preparation of specimens for testing in all test positions. The student will identify principles of arc welding; describe arc welding operations of fillet and groove joints; explain heat treatments of low alloy steels; and explain weld size and profiles. The student will prepare test plates; perform fillet welds in the overhead position; perform air carbon arc weld removal; perform bevel groove welds with backing plates in various positions; and demonstrate use of tools and equipment. Two lecture and four lab hours each week. Work Keys test sections for Applied Math Level 4 and Reading for Information Level 4.  Pre or corequisite: WLDG 1428. Lab fee.

 

Welding – WLDG 2288 – Internship Welder/Welding Technology. Two hours credit. An experience external to the college for an advanced student in a specialized field involving a written agreement between the educational institution and a business or industry. Mentored and supervised by a workplace employee, the student achieves objectives that are developed and documented by the college and that are directly related to specific occupational outcomes. This may be a paid or unpaid experience. The course may be repeated if topic and learning outcomes vary. As outlined in the learning plan, the student will master theory, concepts, and skills involving the tools, materials, equipment, procedures, regulations, laws, and interactions within and among political, economic, environmental, and legal systems associated with the particular occupation and the business/industry; demonstrate ethical behavior, safety practices, interpersonal and teamwork skills, communicate in the applicable language of the occupation and the industry. Eight hours of practical experience each week. Prerequisite: Student must have completed 36 hours of welding courses. Work Keys test sections for Applied Math Level 4 and Reading for Information Level 4.

 

Welding – WLDG 2355 – Advanced Welding Metallurgy. Three hours credit. A study of metallurgy as it applies to welding, including structure, identification, and testing of metals; temperature changes and their effect on welded metals; properties of metals, and factors affecting weldability of ferrous and non-ferrous metals. The student will identify the structure and properties of metals and describe changes that occur when welds are made. The student will perform various metallurgy tests of ferrous and non-ferrous metals. Prerequisite: WLDG 1337. Work Keys test sections for Applied Math Level 4 and Reading for Information Level 4.  Three lecture hours each week.

 

Welding – WLDG 2406 – Intermediate Pipe Welding. Four hours credit. A comprehensive course on the welding of pipe using the shielded metal arc welding (SMAW) process. Position of welds will be 1G, 2G, 5G, and 6G using various electrodes. Topics covered include electrode selection, equipment setup, and safe shop practices. The student will describe equipment and required pipe preparation. The student will perform 1G, 2G, 5 G, and 6G welds using various electrodes. Two lecture and four lab hours each week. Work Keys test sections for Applied Math Level 4 and Reading for Information Level 4. Pre or corequisite: WLDG 1435. Lab fee.

 

Welding – WLDG 2413 – Welding Using Multiple Processes. Four hours credit. Instruction using layout tools and blueprint reading with demonstration and guided practices with some of the following welding processes: oxy-fuel gas cutting and welding, gas metal arc welding, flux-cored arc welding, gas tungsten arc welding, or any other approved welding process. The student will identify proper safety equipment and tools and identify and select the proper welding process for a given application. The student will demonstrate the ability to analyze situations and make decisions using skills as taught concerning safety and electrode selections; and select the most economic and practical welding process for the given tasks. Two lecture and four lab hours each week. Work Keys test sections for Applied Math Level 4 and Reading for Information Level 4.  Pre or corequisite: WLDG 2453. Lab fee.

 

Welding – WLDG 2443 – Advanced Shielded Metal Arc Welding (SMAW). Four hours credit. Advanced topics based on accepted welding codes. Training provided with various electrodes in shielded metal arc welding processes with open V-groove joints in all positions. The student will describe effects of preheating and post weld heating; explain precautions used when welding various metals and alloys; distinguish between qualification and certification procedures; and discuss problems of welding discontinuities. The student will perform open groove welds with mild steel and low alloy electrodes. Two lecture and four lab hours each week. Work Keys test sections for Applied Math Level 4 and Reading for Information Level 4. Pre or corequisite: WLDG 1457. Lab fee.

 

Welding – WLDG 2453 – Advanced Pipe Welding. Four hours credit. Advanced topics involving welding of pipe using the shielded metal arc welding process. Topics include electrode selection, equipment setup, and safe shop practices. Emphasis is on weld positions 5Gand 6G using various electrodes. The student will describe equipment and required pipe preparation and perform 5G and 6G welds using various electrodes. Two lecture and four lab hours each week. Work Keys test sections for Applied Math Level 4 and Reading for Information Level 4.  Pre or corequisite: WLDG 2406. Lab fee.
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